Barry Adamson Takes His Love Sick Dick To Manchester

So here I am sat in the Ruby Lounge, Manchester on the evening of the 22nd of April 2017 and awaiting the presence of one Barry Adamson.

I’d bought my t-shirt and now it was just a matter of waiting for the main event, the support was provided by a lovely singer called Iora (Facebook page HERE) and you really should check this young lady out she has a cracking voice.

Shortly after Iora had completed her set and a slight wait Barry Adamson came on like the cool cat that he is.  Dressed so sharp I cut myself just watching him.  And boy were we not disappointed.

Barry was on cracking form and his humour left me wishing his time onstage of just over an hour was a lifetime instead.

Here’s some of my pics from the gig including a few instagrammed ones I did.

Check out the Facebook Group called Alternate Bites to see a video of Barry doing the final track of his set, “The Light Pours Out Of Me.”

I haven’t enjoyed a gig as much as I did this in a hell of a long time and I’m seeing loads of different bands this year, none will match this one.

Hope you enjoy the pics.

#lovesickdick


Outdoor photos in paris

Five Places to take Stunning Outdoor Photos in Paris

All Photos © Jean-Michel Leclercq.

Jean-Michel Leclercq: Places &emdash; Pink Eiffel Tower

Paris is the capital and largest city of France. It is situated on the river Seine, in northern France, at the heart of the Île-de-France region. The city of Paris, within its administrative limits (the 20 arrondissements), has a population of about 2,200,000. Its metropolitan area is one of the largest population centres in Europe, with more than 12 million inhabitants.

An important settlement for more than two millennia, Paris had become, by the 12th century, one of Europe’s foremost centres of learning and the arts and the largest city in the Western world until the 18th century. Paris is today one of the world’s leading business and cultural centres and its influences in politics, education, entertainment, media, science, and the arts all contribute to its status as one of the world’s major global cities.

Source : Wikipedia

1. The Eiffel Tower

Jean-Michel Leclercq: Places &emdash; Souvenir de Paris

When you think about Paris, you think about the Eiffel Tower, the “place to be” for a tourist and a tourist photographer! (yes i know, all the tourists are photographers!)

By the way, the Trocadero and the Champs de Mars are fantastic places for photography.

I suggest you to start your photowalk at Palais de Chaillot. Here you can shot the Eiffel Tower as a landscape, make great street photos and cross the Seine to shoot “la grande dame” with a fantastic angle!

2. Palais Royal Garden

Jean-Michel Leclercq: Places &emdash; Palais-Royal

The Palais-Royal is a palace and garden located in the 1st arrondissement of Paris. Near the Louvre and the Tuileries, take the time to visit this small and historic garden. It’s really a nice place !

You will have to be as imaginative as possible for photography here. The great perspective is hard to find, but the lines of trees, the benches and the chairs are the best tools for original compositions.

3. Le Pont des Arts

Jean-Michel Leclercq: Red gallery &emdash; Love padlocks

Paris is the city of love!

Love padlocks are a custom by which sweethearts affix padlocks to a fence or similar public fixture to symbolise their love. Most common place of Love padlocks are railings of the bridges.

Love padlocks can be found attached to the Pont des Arts, Passerelle Léopold-Sédar-Senghor and the Pont de l’Archevêché bridges in Paris.

The Pont des Arts or Passerelle des Arts is a pedestrian bridge in Paris which crosses the Seine River. It links the Institut de France and the central square of the palais du Louvre.

From this bridge, take the time to go along the Seine to Notre Dame de Paris.

Pont des Arts - Paris

4. Metro

Jean-Michel Leclercq: Red gallery &emdash; Metro

Paris metro has become a symbol of the city, noted for its uniform architecture influenced by Art Nouveau.

Some stations are gorgeous as Saint-Germain-des-Prés with its “place des poètes”, Cité, Louvre…etc… All of them are ideal places for creative and street photography.

Why not create a thematic photobook about metros of the world?

5. Place du Tertre

Jean-Michel Leclercq: People &emdash; Painter in Paris

Don’t be lazy, go north to the amazing village of Montmartre !

The Place du Tertre is a square in Paris’ XVIIIe arrondissement. Only a few streets away from the Basilica of the Sacré Cœur, it is the heart of the city’s elevated Montmartre quarter.

Discover “le Paris d’Amélie Poulain” with painters, accordion-players and cafés. Draughts-men and painters take possession of the square. They invite you to share an artistic and pleasant time.

 

 

Source

Top 10 Best Bath Brushes of 2017 – Reviews

While we admit that buying a bath brush shouldn’t be too complicated, there is no reason for you to purchase the first one you lay your eyes on. We say this because, despite the relatively cheap price of a bath brush, some are definitely better than others when it comes to build quality and overall durability.

In fact, some manufacturers have established themselves as household names over the years by virtue of the quality brushes they make. To give you a better idea of what the market has in store, we put together a list of the ten best bath brushes money can buy.

Best Bath Brushes 2017

Aquasentials Deluxe Mesh Brush

Aquasentials Deluxe Mesh Brushs

buy from amazonThis top-of-the-line purple-hued bath brush from Aquasentials is an excellent choice of bath brush to invest in. Apart from looking sleek and stylish, it also provides great functionality with its 18-inch long handle and its large and robust mesh surface. This brush maneuvers much better than comparable heavy brush models while its non-slip grip ensures thorough scrubbing and cleaning without the brush ever slipping out of your hands.

The 18-inch handle is perfect for reaching those hard-to-clean spots, and it also lathers exceptionally well with both soaps and showering gels. Perhaps the best feature of this brush is in the non-irritant, silky scrubber the brush makes use of, instead of the usual rough and prickly fibers prevalent in most scrubbers.

Bath Blossom Shower Brush

Bath Blossom Shower Brush

buy from amazonThe Bath blossom shower brush is another premier shower brush which is guaranteed to live up to your expectations. The extra long 16.5-inch handle with a detachable head for versatility makes it easy to reach all parts of your body for a thorough cleanse.

The wood used to make it is top notch and will remain intact and resist stains for years. The soft, natural bristles make for a very pleasant showering experience. Its rounded edges have the ability to fade cellulite, which makes it the pick of choice for most women.

Fuller Foot & Body Brush

Fuller Foot & Body Brush

buy from amazonThe Fuller foot and body brush serves the dual purpose of cleaning both your body and your feet with its massive 27.5-inch long design. The high-duty plastic used to make this brush is light and durable, while also staying stain proof. The well-contoured design makes the brush very easily maneuverable, and the stiff yet still soft bristles glide over your skin, performing a thorough exfoliation. This brush is also fast-drying, which renders it immune to the growth of mold and mildew over time.

Aquasentials Long Handle Bath Brush

Aquasentials Long Handle Bath Brush

buy from amazonThis brush has medium-soft bristles which clean very well without being overly irritating. The fibers lather as well as sponges, with both soaps and gels, and are designed to exfoliate the skin expressly well. Thus, over time your skin will look younger and more radiant.

Measuring 14-inches long, the handle will ensure you never miss out on a spot again. Also, bad odors coming out of a brush or a sponge will be a thing of the past with this model’s fast drying design. This makes sure that the risk of developing mold or mildew is very slim in the long run.

TopNotch Blue Bath Brush

TopNotch Blue Bath Brush

buy from amazonThis brush looks really stylish with it’s blue-theme and is also long lasting because of the high-grade plastic used in it. With its soft brushes, well-balanced contour, non-slip grip and mold resistance, this brush delivers exceptionally well on all counts and is a worthy buy, even at its slightly hefty price tag. An added bonus is the 90-day satisfaction guarantee and the 1-year warranty you get from the manufacturer.

Swissco Deluxe Bath Brush

Swissco Deluxe Bath Brush

buy from amazonIf you’re thinking of replacing your old and worn-out bath brush, then look no further than the Swissco Deluxe Bath Brush. An elite bath brush, with a 16.5 inch long, well-angled handle and a sturdy one-piece design, this model is guaranteed to meet your every expectation. Regardless of the type of soap or shower gel you choose to pair with it, it lathers very well, and it also retains the lather longer than most other brushes. No matter how frequently you use it, the chance of mold formation or mildew is exceptionally low.

TopNotch Body Brush

TopNotch Body Brush

buy from amazonOne of the best back scrubbers and natural anti-cellulite products available on the market, the TopNotch Body Brush has a unique design made out of beech wood which is also, surprisingly light and smooth. The boar bristles are durable and have anti-irritant properties, which makes bathing and cleaning a genuinely pleasurable experience. In addition, you get a free storage bag and a wash mitt along with a 90-day money back guarantee along with a 1-year warranty for good measure.

Natural Boar Bristle Body Brush

Natural Boar Bristle Body Brush

buy from amazonConstructed with the aim of providing a thorough exfoliation, without unduly irritating one’s skin, this Natural Boar Bristle Body Brush is one of the most efficient and at the same time affordable brushes on our list. The boar bristles are durable, easy on the skin and don’t split off easily.

The innovative, practical features of this brush make it a perfect bathroom companion and ideally suited for daily usage. The handle is also outfitted with a cotton loop for easier aeration and faster drying. Furthermore, it also has a cotton loop on the handle and non-irritant, natural bristles.

Rengora Best Bath Brush

Rengora Best Bath Brush

buy from amazonThe Rengora best Bath Brush lives up to its name and promises to give you the bathing experience you’ve dreamt of for years. It soothes your skin and the bristles naturally exfoliate your skin, making it look young and rejuvenated. The smooth, well-rounded wooden handle is immensely sturdy and completely protected from accidental breakage and stains.

A truly unisex brush if there ever was one, the soft bristles are perfect for every skin type and all seasons. The lather made by this brush is also top class, and it spreads out evenly on your body with the wide, detachable brush head.

Bürstenhaus Redecker

Bürstenhaus Redecker

buy from amazonConsistently ranking among the top shower brushes is the Bürstenhaus Redecker. Its soft pig bristles lather very well with all kinds of soap as its non-irritant properties ensure your skin never suffers any blisters or cuts no matter how hard you’re brushing.

The fact that the handle is made out of beech makes it very ergonomic, also when you combine it with a non-slip grip that the brush also has. Unlike a few brushes out there, this one works equally well in both cold and hot water. Not only that but it also handles all types of shower gels and soaps without taking any damage in the long run.

The post Top 10 Best Bath Brushes of 2017 – Reviews appeared first on Savant Magazine – Professional Product Reviews.

The 1850s: A Visually Stunning Photographic History of the Crimean War

Some stunning photographic history focussing on the 1850s when the Crimean War took place.

A few photographers at that time photographed the war but were not successful or their photos did not survive due to natural disasters that struck at that time.

Roger Fenton was one of those war photographers of that time whose photos stood out from the crowd. Considered one of the most famous photographers in the entire history of photography, he’s also one of the most celebrated and influential photographers from England during the 1850s too.

A Short Bio on the Life of this Famous Photographer

Roger Fenton – born in 1819 in Heywood, near Rochdale in England.  He was born in a family with comfortable means and hence had the freedom to pursue his interests.

In the 1840s, Roger studied law in London and later studied painting in London and Paris. He practiced as a lawyer for some time before becoming a photographer.

During the late 1840s/early 1850s, Fenton started experimenting with photography more, while painting too – a few of which were accepted by the Royal Academy, but sadly without any distinction.

His training as a painter helped bring an artistic eye for composition in his photographs that set him apart from other photographers of that time.

Roger liked photographing architecture that he photographed the major churches and Abbeys of Great Britain. He usually worked on large formats of 14 x 18 inches.

Roger made the best use of light and shot images from very good vantage points that gave the architectural images their credits. His photographs of landscapes were also very compelling.

Roger’s first exhibition of his photographs was in 1852 and he later co-founded the Photographic society.

In 1858, a critic for the “Journal of the Photographic Society” wrote for the review of the annual exhibition as,

No one can touch Fenton in landscape. “There is such an artistic feeling about the whole of these pictures … that they cannot fail to strike the beholder as being something more than mere photographs.”

In 1852, Roger traveled to Russia to photograph constructions for civil engineer Charles Vignoles. He then documented the construction of the suspension bridge over the Dnieper River in Ukraine, while photographing a few buildings and other landscapes in Kiev, Moscow and St Petersburg.

Roger used waxed paper negative process of Gustave Le Grey for his photographs.

In 1854, Roger started photographing the British Royal Family, where he had to make visits to the various Royal residences to take portraits of the family members.

He also signed an agreement to photograph art and artifacts of the British Museum collection, the same year.

Camps on plateau before Sebastopol

Title: [Camps on plateau before Sebastopol]; Other Title: Plateau before Sebastopol, Turkish tents in the distance; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29 x 36.3 cm. Summary: View of British camp with Turkish camp in the distance. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9163 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47118 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

A Croat chief

Title: A Croat chief; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 16 cm. Summary: Three-quarter length portrait of man facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9329 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Brigadier General Lockyer & two of his staff

Title: Brigadier General Lockyer & two of his staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 21 x 17 cm. Summary: Brigadier General Henry Frederick Lockyer (seated center) and two of his staff of the 97th Regiment of Foot, full-length portrait, wearing uniforms, posed on steps in front of building. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9175 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Brigadier McPherson & officers of the 4th Division Captain Higham

Title: Brigadier McPherson & officers of the 4th Division Captain Higham [i.e., Heigham], 17th Regiment; Captain Earle, Major of Brigade; Captain Croker, 17th Regiment; Captain Swire; Captain McPherson. Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 18 cm. Summary: Brigadier Philip McPherson, CB., and captains Clement Henry John Heigham, William Henry Earle, (John L. or Edward) Croker, Roger Swire, and Philip McPherson, wearing uniform, posed next to tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9174 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Camp of the 4th Light Dragoons - soldiers quarters

Title: Camp of the 4th Light Dragoons – soldiers quarters; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 26 x 36 cm. Summary: Military camp showing men, huts, and horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9171 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47119 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Graham & Captain Macleod, 42nd Regiment

Title: Captain Graham & Captain Macleod, 42nd Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Graham and Captain Macleod, one seated and one standing in front of tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9157 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Webb's hut, 4th Dragoon Guards

Title: Captain Webb’s hut, 4th Dragoon Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 14 x 21 cm. Summary: Captain John MacDonnell Webb standing in the doorway of his hut looking at Colonel Hodge (standing in profile), Mrs. Rogers, Webb’s servant with a horse, and several others; also shows three bell tents next to the officer’s quarters. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9196 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Bathurst, Grenadier Guards

Title: Captain Bathurst, Grenadier Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Bathurst, full-length portrait, dressed in uniform, standing next to a horse with other horses and buildings in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9114 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Balaklava harbour, the cattle pier

Title: Balaklava harbour, the cattle pier; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29.5 x 36 cm. Summary: A building next to which is a pile of baskets and a holding pen with horses at the landing place on the cattle pier with ship at dock in Balaklava harbor, also view of the landscape of the hills in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9188 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-22039 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Balaclava looking seawards, the Commandant's house in the foreground

Title: Balaclava looking seawards, the Commandant’s house in the foreground; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 27 x 35.5 cm. Summary: Balaklava looking seaward showing general view of the landscape and buildings with the Commandant’s house in the foreground, behind which, to the right, is the ordnance wharf and the harbor with a line of ships receding to the middle distance, and in the upper left corner, the remains of the old Genoese castle perched on the hills that line the harbor. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9142 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2368 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Hall, & group of the 14th

Title: Captain Hall, & group of the 14th; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15 x 20 cm. Summary: Eight soldiers posed near flagpole. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9325 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Clifford, aide-de-camp to General Buller

Title: Captain Clifford, aide-de-camp to General Buller; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Clifford, in uniform, astride a horse, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9323 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cavalry camp, looking towards Kadikoiu

Title: Cavalry camp, looking towards Kadikoi; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 27 x 34 cm. Summary: View of encampment showing bell tents, huts, soldiers, and horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9322 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

A Little History of the Crimean War

If you didn’t know about the history of the Crimean War, it took place from 1853 to 1856 and was fought mostly on the Southern tip of Crimea, which is a peninsula extending into the Black Sea.

This was the location of Russia’s great naval base and the primary objective of Great Britain and France was the destruction of this base at Sevastopol.

Although the main reason for the war is not easy to explain, it seems to have been the result of the motives and ambitions of a few individuals that led to the conflict between Russia and a few other nations.

Between 1854 and 1855, the war took a turn as the engagements in an open battlefield shifted to establishing of the Siege of Sevastopol. War correspondent William Howard Russell’s accounts of the life of soldiers in Balaklava struck a chord with the readers back in the home country.

Group of Croats

Title: Group of Croats; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16.8 x 17 cm. Summary: A group of Croat laborers, seated and standing in front of building. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9351 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47543 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Discussion between two Croats

Title: Discussion between two Croats; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 17 cm. Summary: Two Croats, full-length portrait, one, facing forward, sitting, holding pole; the other, facing right, holding pole, with hand resting on the other’s coat. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9264 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47554 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of the 47th Regiment, winter dress, ready for the trenches

Title: Group of the 47th Regiment, winter dress, ready for the trenches; Other Title: Group of the 47th in winter dress; Group of 47th Regiment in winter dress; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of eight soldiers in winter clothing; one reclining, four sitting, two standing, and one bending over. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9376 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47111 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cooking house, 8th Hussars

Title: Cooking house, 8th Hussars; Other Title: Cookhouse of 8th Hussars; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 21 cm. Summary: Soldiers standing and sitting around cooking pots as a cook ladels food into a bowl; in the background stands a woman and on the left is the side of Fenton’s photographic van. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9344 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47542 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of 4th Dragoon Guards

Title: Group of 4th Dragoon Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of soldiers in camp near shack with goat and horse. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9342 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47839 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Airey & Major Hallewell

Title: Colonel Airey & Major Hallewell; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 16 cm. Summary: Two officers, one standing by horse, the other reclining on ground, with two attendants nearby. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9335 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of Montenegrins

Title: Group of Montenegrins; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18.5 x 17 cm. Summary: Five Montenegrins posed against a tile-roofed structure; one sits in a window. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9293 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-68257 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Head Quarters staff

Title: Head Quarters staff: 1) Colonel Vico; 2) Major the Honourable Leicester Curzon; 3) Lord Burghersh; 4) Orderly; 5) Count Revel; 6) Mr. Calvert Interpreter; 7) Colonel Poulet[t] Somerset; 8) Colonel A. Hardinge; 9) Dr. Prendergast; 10) Commander Maxse; 11) Colonel Kingcote; Other Title: British and French staff officers at Headquarters Staff at Head Quarters; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: British and French staff officers, full-length group portrait, posed sitting and standing on steps at British(?) headquarters. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9283 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cossack Bay, Balaklava

Title: Cossack Bay, Balaklava; Other Title: The cattle wharf, Balaclava; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29.5 x 36 cm. Summary: A building next to which is a pile of baskets and a holding pen with horses at the landing place on the cattle pier with several ships at dock in Balaklava harbor, also view of bell tents at water’s edge and the landscape of the hills in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9205 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2375 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

General view of Balaklava, the hospital on the right

Title: General view of Balaklava, the hospital on the right; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 30 x 36 cm. Summary: Includes buildings in the foreground, a view of the harbor, and military tents scattered on the hills to the left in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9198 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2370 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Brownrigg C.B. & the two Russian boys Alma & Inkermann

Title: Colonel Brownrigg C.B. & the two Russian boys Alma & Inkermann; Other Title: Colonel Brownrigg and the captured Russian boys; Lieutenant Colonel Brownrigg, Grenadier Guards with two Russian boys; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Colonel Brownrigg, full-length portrait, seated, facing right; and two Russian boys, one standing and one sitting, at entrance to tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9158 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-16980 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Doherty, officers & men of the 13th Light Dragoons

Title: Colonel Doherty, officers & men of the 13th Light Dragoons; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 22.3 cm. Summary: Group of men of the 13th Light Dragoons, including Colonel Doherty, Cornet Danzil Chamberlayne, Captain Jenyns, and veterinary-surgeon Thomas Towers, one man seated on ground with dog; tents and huts in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9230 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

General Cissé, chief of the staff to General Bosquet, & aide-de-camp

Title: General Cissé, chief of the staff to General Bosquet, & aide-de-camp; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9312 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Henry Duberly Esqr., paymaster, 8th Hussars, & Mrs. Duberly

Title: Henry Duberly Esqr., paymaster, 8th Hussars, & Mrs. Duberly; Other Title: Captain Henry Duberly and “the dashing” Mrs. Duberly; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 16 cm. Summary: Henry Duberly standing before Isabella Duberly who is on horseback. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9194 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-68798 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Clarke, Scots' Greys, with the horse wounded at Balaklava

Title: Colonel Clarke, Scots’ Greys, with the horse wounded at Balaklava; Other Title: Colonel George Clarke, Royal Scots Greys; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Colonel George Clarke, full-length portrait, wearing uniform, standing beside his horse, Sultan, facing left; horse’s reins are held by a man who is possibly a servant; horse’s rump is branded “2D” for 2nd Dragoons; encampment of tents in background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9115 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger’s Career as the Crimean War Photographer

The British government made several attempts to document the war through photography, but they all failed for various reasons.

It was at this time, Thomas Agnew of publishing house Thomas Agnew and Sons thought about sending a photographer to the Crimea to document evidence of the war that would help mitigate the negative reports appearing in newspapers.

Thomas during this time had proposed Roger to be the official photographer for the Crimea. Roger purchased a former wine merchant’s van and converted it into a mobile darkroom. He also hired an assistant and

Roger purchased a former wine merchant’s van and converted it into a mobile darkroom. He also hired an assistant and traveled the English countryside to test the van.

In November 1854, Roger traveled to Crimea on board the Hecla, under the Royal patronage and with the assistance of the British government.

He took with him his horse-drawn van (converted to a mobile darkroom) carrying all the equipment required for photography:

  • Five large cameras,
  • 700 glass plates stacked in wooden boxes,
  • Several chests of chemicals,
  • Printing frames, and
  • His personal supply of preserved meats, wine, beer, biscuits and horse tackle.
The artist's van

Title: The artist’s van; Other Title: The photographic van with Sparling on the box; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: Marcus Sparling, full-length portrait, seated on Roger Fenton’s photographic van. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9240 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2319 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

When Roger arrived at Crimea, he had already received huge patronage from Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. He photographed the horrors of the war but was reluctant to shoot certain negative aspects of the war for other reasons.

This could be because he was supported by the Royal family and the government, plus he was financed by Thomas Agnew that he had to abide by the sensitive nature of the Victorian rule.

In 1855, Roger made a picture of the Crimean war that became an iconic image “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” and made its name in the history of war photography. Roger describes the scene as,

“…in coming to a ravine called the valley of death, the sight passed all imagination: round shot and shell lay like a stream at the bottom of the hollow all the way down, you could not walk without treading upon them…

In exhibitions across England, one described the image as “hell-like,” an area ‘rough with shot, and bare, stony and blasted as an accursed and unholy place’.

While another wrote that it ‘raises melancholy thoughts of the rude trials to which our brave countrymen and allies have been subjected for a whole dreary year’.

The valley of the shadow of death

Title: The valley of the shadow of death; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 28 x 36 cm. Summary: Dirt road in ravine scattered with cannonballs. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-35546 (digital file from original item) LC-USZC4-9217 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2322 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger limited his photography to shooting the allies, the care and quality of camp life for British soldiers, the scenes of Balaklava and around, but refrained from photographing the war scenes and their aftermath although he witnessed them.

He had to carefully choose subjects to photograph as no dead, wounded or horror views were to be shown according to the Victorian command.

Thomas Agnew and Sons relied upon Roger’s images as they aimed to make a profit from those images by selling them to soldiers and their families.

As you can imagine, Roger had to overcome several difficulties while photographing the Crimean war. Since he was using the

Since he was using the wet-plate collodion process, due to the heat there, he found the developing part very difficult, as it dried out quickly leaving spots and streaks on the glass. Dust and flies were his enemies too.

Despite these difficulties, Roger managed to make around 360 photographs within a 3 month period before returning to England.

When the assault on Sevastapol in June 1855 failed, Roger who was ill with Cholera sold his van, packed up his equipment and sailed out of Balaklava. The fall of Sevastopol in September 1855, was documented by another photographer, James Robertson.

Sebastopol from the front of Cathcart's Hill

Title: Sebastopol from the front of Cathcart’s Hill; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 23 x 35 cm. Summary: Distant view of Sevastopolʹ from Cathcart’s Hill; on plain are five men and a conical tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9261 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Reverend Mr. Butler & officers of the 47th Regiment

Title: Reverend Mr. Butler & officers of the 47th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15 x 19 cm. Summary: Reverend Mr. Butler and four officers, full-length portrait, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9339 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Major General Estcourt, Adj.-Gen. Major De Morel

Title: Major General Estcourt, Adj.-Gen. Major De Morel, Captain Thompson, Lieutenant-Colonel Blane, Major Kirkland, Lieutenant-Colonel the Honour[able] W.L. Pakenham, officers of his staff; Other Title: Major-General James Bucknell Estcourt and staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Major General James Bucknell and staff outdoors in front of building, full-length portrait. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9338 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Mortar batteries in front of Picquet house Light Division

Title: Mortar batteries in front of Picquet house Light Division; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24 x 35.5 cm. Summary: Photo shows five men and three mortars at a mortar battery with bomb-proof shelter. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9300 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-16031 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, K.C.B

Title: Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, K.C.B. Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.5 x 16 cm. Summary: Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, half-length portrait, standing with arm resting on stone wall. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9315 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Pennefather, & Captain Wing, Captain Layard

Title: Lieutenant General Pennefather, & Captain Wing, Captain Layard, Captain Ellison, Colonel Wilbraham, Colonel Percy Herbert, Major Thackwell & Dr. Wood, officers of his staff; Other Title: Lieu.t Gen.l Sir J.L. Pennefather & his staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15.5 x 21 cm. Summary: Group portrait with Pennefather seated in the center, ten officers sitting or standing to the left and right of Pennefather. One additional figure appears at far right of the group. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9202 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47533 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Kamara Heights in the distance, artillery waggons in the foreground

Title: [Kamara Heights in the distance, artillery waggons in the foreground]; Other Title: Panorama of the Plateau of Sebastopol in eleven parts (1855); Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 26 x 37 cm. Summary: View of plateau of Sevastopolʹ showing rows of caissons, with tents on the plains in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9191 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Officers of the 89th Regiment at Cathcart's Hill, in winter dress

Title: Officers of the 89th Regiment at Cathcart’s Hill, in winter dress, Captain Skynner, Lieutenant Knatchbull, Captain Conyers, Lieutenant Longfield, Captain Hawley; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 20 cm. Summary: Captain Leslie Skynner, Lieutenant Francis Knatchbull, Captain Robert Rowland Conyers, Lieutenant John Longfield, and Captain Robert B. Hawley, full-length portrait, wearing uniforms, one standing, two leaning against large rock, and two reclining on the ground. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9140 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant-colonel Shadforth at his hut & officers of the 57th Regiment

Title: Lieutenant-colonel Shadforth at his hut & officers of the 57th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 21 cm. Summary: Lieutenant-colonel Thomas Shadforth sitting before his hut surrounded by officers in relaxed poses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9119 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Sir George Brown G.C.B. & officers of his staff Major Hallewell

Title: Lieutenant General Sir George Brown G.C.B. & officers of his staff Major Hallewell, Colonel Brownrigg, orderly, Colonel Airey, Captain Pearson, Captain Markham, Captain Ponsonby.; Other Title: Lieut.-General Sir George Brown and staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17.3 x 16.7 cm. Summary: General Brown seated, and officers of the Light Division, most standing, wearing uniforms and hats. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9235 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47555 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Nubian servants & horses

Title: Nubian servants & horses; Other Title: Turkish irregulars; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.3 x 17 cm. Summary: Two men, full-length portraits, facing front, standing with horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9233 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Railway officials, messrs. Swan, Cadell, Middleton, Howse, & Kellock

Title: Railway officials, messrs. Swan, Cadell, Middleton, Howse, & Kellock; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20.3 x 17 cm. Summary: Five men seated and standing in front of building with tile roof. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9229 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47841 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Major Butler, 28th Regiment

Title: Major Butler, 28th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 16 cm. Summary: Major Percy Archer Butler, full-length portrait, dressed in uniform, seated, holding a sword, with conical tents in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9118 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47530 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger and His Photographs after the Crimean War

Rogers’s crimean war photographs offer a record of the history of the war and some of the photographs went on sale in November 1855. By December 1856, Thomas Agnew and Sons disposed of the entire holdings of unsold sets, prints and negatives at an auction.

In September 1855, 312 of Roger’s photographs were exhibited at an exhibit opened at the Water Colour Society’s Pall Mall East establishment in London.

Thomas Agnew & Sons issued 337 photographs on published mounts between November 1855 and April 1856.

A complete work of Roger Fenton, consisting of 160 of the photographs, was issued under the title “Photographs taken under the patronage of Her Majesty the Queen in the Crimea” by Roger Fenton, Esq.

Another 159 photographs were issued in folios under the following titles:

  • Historical Portrait Gallery (30 photographs)
  • Views of the Camp, scenery, etc. (50 photographs)
  • Incidents from Camp Life (60 photographs).
  • Two sets of panoramas were issued, The Photographic panorama of the plateau of Sebastopol (11 photographs) and Photographic panoramas of the plains of Balaklava and valley of Inkermann (8 photographs).
Sir Henry Rawlinson, Sanitary Commissioner

Title: “Sir Henry Rawlinson”, Sanitary Commissioner; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 32.7 x 25 cm. Summary: This is probably a portrait of Robert Rawlinson (the Sanitary Commissioners are identified on the published mount from the George Eastman House Roger Fenton Series as “Dr. Sutherland Robert Rawlinson, Esq. …”, see no. 128x); full-length portrait, seated with right elbow resting on table, right hand on cheek, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9371 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-52453 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Two sergeants, 4th Light Dragoons

Title: Two sergeants, 4th Light Dragoons; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 16 cm. Summary: Two sergeants, full-length view, standing, facing each other; one pouring beverage into a glass held by the other. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9265 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47537 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Zouaves & soldiers of the line

Title: Zouaves & soldiers of the line; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Two soldiers standing next to three Zouave soldiers sitting and smoking. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9249 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2451 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The cemetery Cathcart's Hill - the Picquet House

Title: The cemetery Cathcart’s Hill – the Picquet House, Victoria Redoubt and the Redoubt des Anglais in the distance; Other Title: Panorama of the Plateau of Sebastopol in eleven parts (1855) Plateau of Sebastopol; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24 x 34 cm. Summary: The cemetery on Cathcart’s Hill. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9280 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47538 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Two Zouaves

Title: Two Zouaves; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 18 cm. Summary: Two French Army Zouaves, wearing uniforms. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9187 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Zouave & officer of the Saphis

Title: Zouave & officer of the Saphis [i.e., Spahis]; Other Title: Zouave & Spahi, attendants of Marechal Pelissier; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20 x 17 cm. Summary: Zouave, full-length portrait, seated, facing right and Spahi officer, full-length portrait, standing, facing left. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9154 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

View of the lines of Balaclava from Guard's Hill; Canrobert's Hill in the distance

Title: View of the lines of Balaclava from Guard’s Hill; Canrobert’s Hill in the distance; Other Title: The lines of Balaclava; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 30 x 36 cm. Summary: Men, buildings, and tents on hillside above valley; below in the distance are more tents and hills. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9144 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47117 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The sanitary commission

Title: The sanitary commission; Other Title: Sanitary commissioners; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: Dr. John Sutherland, full-length portrait, sitting on table, facing right, and Robert Rawlinson, full-length portrait sitting on chair, facing left. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9246 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-77794 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Tartar labourers

Title: Tartar labourers; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of Tatars at work repairing roadway in Balaklava; wooden hut, “Store 14th Regiment”, in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9238 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47536 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The tombs of the generals on Cathcart's Hill

Title: The tombs of the generals on Cathcart’s Hill; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24.5 x 34.5 cm. Summary: Cemetery on Cathcart’s Hill showing graves and a man standing at the grave of Brigadier General Thomas Leigh Goldie who was killed in action at the Battle of Inkerman. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9222 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-57972 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The End of Roger’s Photographic Journey

Roger gave up photography in 1862 after photographing a final series of remarkable still lives after which he auctioned off all of his photographic equipment and negatives. He also resigned from the Royal Photographic Society and returned to practice law.

After being ill for a short period of time, Roger died in 1869.

Roger’s images stand as an example for attempts made in early history to document war through a medium called photography.

The Library of Congress purchased 263 of Fenton’s salted paper and albumen prints from his grand niece Frances Fenton in 1944. To view Roger’s full collection at the Library of Congress, head over here.

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The post The 1850s: A Visually Stunning Photographic History of the Crimean War appeared first on Light Stalking.

The 1850s: A Visually Stunning Photographic History of the Crimean War

Some stunning photographic history focussing on the 1850s when the Crimean War took place.

A few photographers at that time photographed the war but were not successful or their photos did not survive due to natural disasters that struck at that time.

Roger Fenton was one of those war photographers of that time whose photos stood out from the crowd. Considered one of the most famous photographers in the entire history of photography, he’s also one of the most celebrated and influential photographers from England during the 1850s too.

A Short Bio on the Life of this Famous Photographer

Roger Fenton – born in 1819 in Heywood, near Rochdale in England.  He was born in a family with comfortable means and hence had the freedom to pursue his interests.

In the 1840s, Roger studied law in London and later studied painting in London and Paris. He practiced as a lawyer for some time before becoming a photographer.

During the late 1840s/early 1850s, Fenton started experimenting with photography more, while painting too – a few of which were accepted by the Royal Academy, but sadly without any distinction.

His training as a painter helped bring an artistic eye for composition in his photographs that set him apart from other photographers of that time.

Roger liked photographing architecture that he photographed the major churches and Abbeys of Great Britain. He usually worked on large formats of 14 x 18 inches.

Roger made the best use of light and shot images from very good vantage points that gave the architectural images their credits. His photographs of landscapes were also very compelling.

Roger’s first exhibition of his photographs was in 1852 and he later co-founded the Photographic society.

In 1858, a critic for the “Journal of the Photographic Society” wrote for the review of the annual exhibition as,

No one can touch Fenton in landscape. “There is such an artistic feeling about the whole of these pictures … that they cannot fail to strike the beholder as being something more than mere photographs.”

In 1852, Roger traveled to Russia to photograph constructions for civil engineer Charles Vignoles. He then documented the construction of the suspension bridge over the Dnieper River in Ukraine, while photographing a few buildings and other landscapes in Kiev, Moscow and St Petersburg.

Roger used waxed paper negative process of Gustave Le Grey for his photographs.

In 1854, Roger started photographing the British Royal Family, where he had to make visits to the various Royal residences to take portraits of the family members.

He also signed an agreement to photograph art and artifacts of the British Museum collection, the same year.

Camps on plateau before Sebastopol

Title: [Camps on plateau before Sebastopol]; Other Title: Plateau before Sebastopol, Turkish tents in the distance; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29 x 36.3 cm. Summary: View of British camp with Turkish camp in the distance. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9163 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47118 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

A Croat chief

Title: A Croat chief; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 16 cm. Summary: Three-quarter length portrait of man facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9329 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Brigadier General Lockyer & two of his staff

Title: Brigadier General Lockyer & two of his staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 21 x 17 cm. Summary: Brigadier General Henry Frederick Lockyer (seated center) and two of his staff of the 97th Regiment of Foot, full-length portrait, wearing uniforms, posed on steps in front of building. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9175 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Brigadier McPherson & officers of the 4th Division Captain Higham

Title: Brigadier McPherson & officers of the 4th Division Captain Higham [i.e., Heigham], 17th Regiment; Captain Earle, Major of Brigade; Captain Croker, 17th Regiment; Captain Swire; Captain McPherson. Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 18 cm. Summary: Brigadier Philip McPherson, CB., and captains Clement Henry John Heigham, William Henry Earle, (John L. or Edward) Croker, Roger Swire, and Philip McPherson, wearing uniform, posed next to tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9174 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Camp of the 4th Light Dragoons - soldiers quarters

Title: Camp of the 4th Light Dragoons – soldiers quarters; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 26 x 36 cm. Summary: Military camp showing men, huts, and horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9171 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47119 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Graham & Captain Macleod, 42nd Regiment

Title: Captain Graham & Captain Macleod, 42nd Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Graham and Captain Macleod, one seated and one standing in front of tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9157 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Webb's hut, 4th Dragoon Guards

Title: Captain Webb’s hut, 4th Dragoon Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 14 x 21 cm. Summary: Captain John MacDonnell Webb standing in the doorway of his hut looking at Colonel Hodge (standing in profile), Mrs. Rogers, Webb’s servant with a horse, and several others; also shows three bell tents next to the officer’s quarters. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9196 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Bathurst, Grenadier Guards

Title: Captain Bathurst, Grenadier Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Bathurst, full-length portrait, dressed in uniform, standing next to a horse with other horses and buildings in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9114 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Balaklava harbour, the cattle pier

Title: Balaklava harbour, the cattle pier; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29.5 x 36 cm. Summary: A building next to which is a pile of baskets and a holding pen with horses at the landing place on the cattle pier with ship at dock in Balaklava harbor, also view of the landscape of the hills in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9188 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-22039 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Balaclava looking seawards, the Commandant's house in the foreground

Title: Balaclava looking seawards, the Commandant’s house in the foreground; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 27 x 35.5 cm. Summary: Balaklava looking seaward showing general view of the landscape and buildings with the Commandant’s house in the foreground, behind which, to the right, is the ordnance wharf and the harbor with a line of ships receding to the middle distance, and in the upper left corner, the remains of the old Genoese castle perched on the hills that line the harbor. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9142 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2368 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Hall, & group of the 14th

Title: Captain Hall, & group of the 14th; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15 x 20 cm. Summary: Eight soldiers posed near flagpole. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9325 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Captain Clifford, aide-de-camp to General Buller

Title: Captain Clifford, aide-de-camp to General Buller; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Captain Clifford, in uniform, astride a horse, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9323 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cavalry camp, looking towards Kadikoiu

Title: Cavalry camp, looking towards Kadikoi; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 27 x 34 cm. Summary: View of encampment showing bell tents, huts, soldiers, and horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9322 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

A Little History of the Crimean War

If you didn’t know about the history of the Crimean War, it took place from 1853 to 1856 and was fought mostly on the Southern tip of Crimea, which is a peninsula extending into the Black Sea.

This was the location of Russia’s great naval base and the primary objective of Great Britain and France was the destruction of this base at Sevastopol.

Although the main reason for the war is not easy to explain, it seems to have been the result of the motives and ambitions of a few individuals that led to the conflict between Russia and a few other nations.

Between 1854 and 1855, the war took a turn as the engagements in an open battlefield shifted to establishing of the Siege of Sevastopol. War correspondent William Howard Russell’s accounts of the life of soldiers in Balaklava struck a chord with the readers back in the home country.

Group of Croats

Title: Group of Croats; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16.8 x 17 cm. Summary: A group of Croat laborers, seated and standing in front of building. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9351 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47543 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Discussion between two Croats

Title: Discussion between two Croats; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 17 cm. Summary: Two Croats, full-length portrait, one, facing forward, sitting, holding pole; the other, facing right, holding pole, with hand resting on the other’s coat. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9264 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47554 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of the 47th Regiment, winter dress, ready for the trenches

Title: Group of the 47th Regiment, winter dress, ready for the trenches; Other Title: Group of the 47th in winter dress; Group of 47th Regiment in winter dress; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of eight soldiers in winter clothing; one reclining, four sitting, two standing, and one bending over. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9376 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47111 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cooking house, 8th Hussars

Title: Cooking house, 8th Hussars; Other Title: Cookhouse of 8th Hussars; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 21 cm. Summary: Soldiers standing and sitting around cooking pots as a cook ladels food into a bowl; in the background stands a woman and on the left is the side of Fenton’s photographic van. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9344 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47542 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of 4th Dragoon Guards

Title: Group of 4th Dragoon Guards; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of soldiers in camp near shack with goat and horse. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9342 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47839 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Airey & Major Hallewell

Title: Colonel Airey & Major Hallewell; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 16 cm. Summary: Two officers, one standing by horse, the other reclining on ground, with two attendants nearby. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9335 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Group of Montenegrins

Title: Group of Montenegrins; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18.5 x 17 cm. Summary: Five Montenegrins posed against a tile-roofed structure; one sits in a window. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9293 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-68257 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Head Quarters staff

Title: Head Quarters staff: 1) Colonel Vico; 2) Major the Honourable Leicester Curzon; 3) Lord Burghersh; 4) Orderly; 5) Count Revel; 6) Mr. Calvert Interpreter; 7) Colonel Poulet[t] Somerset; 8) Colonel A. Hardinge; 9) Dr. Prendergast; 10) Commander Maxse; 11) Colonel Kingcote; Other Title: British and French staff officers at Headquarters Staff at Head Quarters; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: British and French staff officers, full-length group portrait, posed sitting and standing on steps at British(?) headquarters. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9283 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Cossack Bay, Balaklava

Title: Cossack Bay, Balaklava; Other Title: The cattle wharf, Balaclava; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 29.5 x 36 cm. Summary: A building next to which is a pile of baskets and a holding pen with horses at the landing place on the cattle pier with several ships at dock in Balaklava harbor, also view of bell tents at water’s edge and the landscape of the hills in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9205 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2375 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

General view of Balaklava, the hospital on the right

Title: General view of Balaklava, the hospital on the right; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 30 x 36 cm. Summary: Includes buildings in the foreground, a view of the harbor, and military tents scattered on the hills to the left in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9198 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2370 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Brownrigg C.B. & the two Russian boys Alma & Inkermann

Title: Colonel Brownrigg C.B. & the two Russian boys Alma & Inkermann; Other Title: Colonel Brownrigg and the captured Russian boys; Lieutenant Colonel Brownrigg, Grenadier Guards with two Russian boys; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Colonel Brownrigg, full-length portrait, seated, facing right; and two Russian boys, one standing and one sitting, at entrance to tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9158 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-16980 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Doherty, officers & men of the 13th Light Dragoons

Title: Colonel Doherty, officers & men of the 13th Light Dragoons; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 22.3 cm. Summary: Group of men of the 13th Light Dragoons, including Colonel Doherty, Cornet Danzil Chamberlayne, Captain Jenyns, and veterinary-surgeon Thomas Towers, one man seated on ground with dog; tents and huts in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9230 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

General Cissé, chief of the staff to General Bosquet, & aide-de-camp

Title: General Cissé, chief of the staff to General Bosquet, & aide-de-camp; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9312 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Henry Duberly Esqr., paymaster, 8th Hussars, & Mrs. Duberly

Title: Henry Duberly Esqr., paymaster, 8th Hussars, & Mrs. Duberly; Other Title: Captain Henry Duberly and “the dashing” Mrs. Duberly; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 16 x 16 cm. Summary: Henry Duberly standing before Isabella Duberly who is on horseback. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9194 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-68798 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Colonel Clarke, Scots' Greys, with the horse wounded at Balaklava

Title: Colonel Clarke, Scots’ Greys, with the horse wounded at Balaklava; Other Title: Colonel George Clarke, Royal Scots Greys; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 17 cm. Summary: Colonel George Clarke, full-length portrait, wearing uniform, standing beside his horse, Sultan, facing left; horse’s reins are held by a man who is possibly a servant; horse’s rump is branded “2D” for 2nd Dragoons; encampment of tents in background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9115 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger’s Career as the Crimean War Photographer

The British government made several attempts to document the war through photography, but they all failed for various reasons.

It was at this time, Thomas Agnew of publishing house Thomas Agnew and Sons thought about sending a photographer to the Crimea to document evidence of the war that would help mitigate the negative reports appearing in newspapers.

Thomas during this time had proposed Roger to be the official photographer for the Crimea. Roger purchased a former wine merchant’s van and converted it into a mobile darkroom. He also hired an assistant and traveled the English countryside to test the van.

In November 1854, Roger traveled to Crimea on board the Hecla, under the Royal patronage and with the assistance of the British government.

He took with him his horse-drawn van (converted to a mobile darkroom) carrying all the equipment required for photography:

  • Five large cameras,
  • 700 glass plates stacked in wooden boxes,
  • Several chests of chemicals,
  • Printing frames, and
  • His personal supply of preserved meats, wine, beer, biscuits and horse tackle.
The artist's van

Title: The artist’s van; Other Title: The photographic van with Sparling on the box; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: Marcus Sparling, full-length portrait, seated on Roger Fenton’s photographic van. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9240 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2319 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

When Roger arrived at Crimea, he had already received huge patronage from Queen Victoria and Prince Albert. He photographed the horrors of the war but was reluctant to shoot certain negative aspects of the war for other reasons.

This could be because he was supported by the Royal family and the government, plus he was financed by Thomas Agnew that he had to abide by the sensitive nature of the Victorian rule.

In 1855, Roger made a picture of the Crimean war that became an iconic image “The Valley of the Shadow of Death” and made its name in the history of war photography. Roger describes the scene as,

“…in coming to a ravine called the valley of death, the sight passed all imagination: round shot and shell lay like a stream at the bottom of the hollow all the way down, you could not walk without treading upon them…

In exhibitions across England, one described the image as “hell-like,” an area ‘rough with shot, and bare, stony and blasted as an accursed and unholy place’.

While another wrote that it ‘raises melancholy thoughts of the rude trials to which our brave countrymen and allies have been subjected for a whole dreary year’.

The valley of the shadow of death

Title: The valley of the shadow of death; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 28 x 36 cm. Summary: Dirt road in ravine scattered with cannonballs. Reproduction Number: LC-DIG-ppmsca-35546 (digital file from original item) LC-USZC4-9217 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2322 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger limited his photography to shooting the allies, the care and quality of camp life for British soldiers, the scenes of Balaklava and around, but refrained from photographing the war scenes and their aftermath although he witnessed them.

He had to carefully choose subjects to photograph as no dead, wounded or horror views were to be shown according to the Victorian command.

Thomas Agnew and Sons relied upon Roger’s images as they aimed to make a profit from those images by selling them to soldiers and their families.

As you can imagine, Roger had to overcome several difficulties while photographing the Crimean war. Since he was using the wet-plate collodion process, due to the heat there, he found the developing part very difficult, as it dried out quickly leaving spots and streaks on the glass. Dust and flies were his enemies too.

Despite these difficulties, Roger managed to make around 360 photographs within a 3 month period before returning to England.

When the assault on Sevastapol in June 1855 failed, Roger who was ill with Cholera sold his van, packed up his equipment and sailed out of Balaklava. The fall of Sevastopol in September 1855, was documented by another photographer, James Robertson.

Sebastopol from the front of Cathcart's Hill

Title: Sebastopol from the front of Cathcart’s Hill; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 23 x 35 cm. Summary: Distant view of Sevastopolʹ from Cathcart’s Hill; on plain are five men and a conical tent. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9261 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Reverend Mr. Butler & officers of the 47th Regiment

Title: Reverend Mr. Butler & officers of the 47th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15 x 19 cm. Summary: Reverend Mr. Butler and four officers, full-length portrait, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9339 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Major General Estcourt, Adj.-Gen. Major De Morel

Title: Major General Estcourt, Adj.-Gen. Major De Morel, Captain Thompson, Lieutenant-Colonel Blane, Major Kirkland, Lieutenant-Colonel the Honour[able] W.L. Pakenham, officers of his staff; Other Title: Major-General James Bucknell Estcourt and staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Major General James Bucknell and staff outdoors in front of building, full-length portrait. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9338 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Mortar batteries in front of Picquet house Light Division

Title: Mortar batteries in front of Picquet house Light Division; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24 x 35.5 cm. Summary: Photo shows five men and three mortars at a mortar battery with bomb-proof shelter. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9300 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-16031 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, K.C.B

Title: Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, K.C.B. Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.5 x 16 cm. Summary: Lieutenant General Sir Harry Jones, half-length portrait, standing with arm resting on stone wall. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9315 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Pennefather, & Captain Wing, Captain Layard

Title: Lieutenant General Pennefather, & Captain Wing, Captain Layard, Captain Ellison, Colonel Wilbraham, Colonel Percy Herbert, Major Thackwell & Dr. Wood, officers of his staff; Other Title: Lieu.t Gen.l Sir J.L. Pennefather & his staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 15.5 x 21 cm. Summary: Group portrait with Pennefather seated in the center, ten officers sitting or standing to the left and right of Pennefather. One additional figure appears at far right of the group. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9202 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47533 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Kamara Heights in the distance, artillery waggons in the foreground

Title: [Kamara Heights in the distance, artillery waggons in the foreground]; Other Title: Panorama of the Plateau of Sebastopol in eleven parts (1855); Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 26 x 37 cm. Summary: View of plateau of Sevastopolʹ showing rows of caissons, with tents on the plains in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9191 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Officers of the 89th Regiment at Cathcart's Hill, in winter dress

Title: Officers of the 89th Regiment at Cathcart’s Hill, in winter dress, Captain Skynner, Lieutenant Knatchbull, Captain Conyers, Lieutenant Longfield, Captain Hawley; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 20 cm. Summary: Captain Leslie Skynner, Lieutenant Francis Knatchbull, Captain Robert Rowland Conyers, Lieutenant John Longfield, and Captain Robert B. Hawley, full-length portrait, wearing uniforms, one standing, two leaning against large rock, and two reclining on the ground. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9140 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant-colonel Shadforth at his hut & officers of the 57th Regiment

Title: Lieutenant-colonel Shadforth at his hut & officers of the 57th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17 x 21 cm. Summary: Lieutenant-colonel Thomas Shadforth sitting before his hut surrounded by officers in relaxed poses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9119 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Lieutenant General Sir George Brown G.C.B. & officers of his staff Major Hallewell

Title: Lieutenant General Sir George Brown G.C.B. & officers of his staff Major Hallewell, Colonel Brownrigg, orderly, Colonel Airey, Captain Pearson, Captain Markham, Captain Ponsonby.; Other Title: Lieut.-General Sir George Brown and staff; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 17.3 x 16.7 cm. Summary: General Brown seated, and officers of the Light Division, most standing, wearing uniforms and hats. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9235 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47555 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Nubian servants & horses

Title: Nubian servants & horses; Other Title: Turkish irregulars; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.3 x 17 cm. Summary: Two men, full-length portraits, facing front, standing with horses. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9233 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Railway officials, messrs. Swan, Cadell, Middleton, Howse, & Kellock

Title: Railway officials, messrs. Swan, Cadell, Middleton, Howse, & Kellock; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20.3 x 17 cm. Summary: Five men seated and standing in front of building with tile roof. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9229 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47841 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Major Butler, 28th Regiment

Title: Major Butler, 28th Regiment; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 16 cm. Summary: Major Percy Archer Butler, full-length portrait, dressed in uniform, seated, holding a sword, with conical tents in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9118 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47530 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Roger and His Photographs after the Crimean War

Rogers’s crimean war photographs offer a record of the history of the war and some of the photographs went on sale in November 1855. By December 1856, Thomas Agnew and Sons disposed of the entire holdings of unsold sets, prints and negatives at an auction.

In September 1855, 312 of Roger’s photographs were exhibited at an exhibit opened at the Water Colour Society’s Pall Mall East establishment in London.

Thomas Agnew & Sons issued 337 photographs on published mounts between November 1855 and April 1856.

A complete work of Roger Fenton, consisting of 160 of the photographs, was issued under the title “Photographs taken under the patronage of Her Majesty the Queen in the Crimea” by Roger Fenton, Esq.

Another 159 photographs were issued in folios under the following titles:

  • Historical Portrait Gallery (30 photographs)
  • Views of the Camp, scenery, etc. (50 photographs)
  • Incidents from Camp Life (60 photographs).
  • Two sets of panoramas were issued, The Photographic panorama of the plateau of Sebastopol (11 photographs) and Photographic panoramas of the plains of Balaklava and valley of Inkermann (8 photographs).
Sir Henry Rawlinson, Sanitary Commissioner

Title: “Sir Henry Rawlinson”, Sanitary Commissioner; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 32.7 x 25 cm. Summary: This is probably a portrait of Robert Rawlinson (the Sanitary Commissioners are identified on the published mount from the George Eastman House Roger Fenton Series as “Dr. Sutherland Robert Rawlinson, Esq. …”, see no. 128x); full-length portrait, seated with right elbow resting on table, right hand on cheek, facing front. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9371 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-52453 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Two sergeants, 4th Light Dragoons

Title: Two sergeants, 4th Light Dragoons; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 16 cm. Summary: Two sergeants, full-length view, standing, facing each other; one pouring beverage into a glass held by the other. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9265 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47537 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Zouaves & soldiers of the line

Title: Zouaves & soldiers of the line; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 18 x 17 cm. Summary: Two soldiers standing next to three Zouave soldiers sitting and smoking. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9249 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-2451 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The cemetery Cathcart's Hill - the Picquet House

Title: The cemetery Cathcart’s Hill – the Picquet House, Victoria Redoubt and the Redoubt des Anglais in the distance; Other Title: Panorama of the Plateau of Sebastopol in eleven parts (1855) Plateau of Sebastopol; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24 x 34 cm. Summary: The cemetery on Cathcart’s Hill. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9280 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47538 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Two Zouaves

Title: Two Zouaves; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 18 cm. Summary: Two French Army Zouaves, wearing uniforms. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9187 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Zouave & officer of the Saphis

Title: Zouave & officer of the Saphis [i.e., Spahis]; Other Title: Zouave & Spahi, attendants of Marechal Pelissier; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 20 x 17 cm. Summary: Zouave, full-length portrait, seated, facing right and Spahi officer, full-length portrait, standing, facing left. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9154 (color film copy transparency); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

View of the lines of Balaclava from Guard's Hill; Canrobert's Hill in the distance

Title: View of the lines of Balaclava from Guard’s Hill; Canrobert’s Hill in the distance; Other Title: The lines of Balaclava; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 30 x 36 cm. Summary: Men, buildings, and tents on hillside above valley; below in the distance are more tents and hills. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9144 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47117 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The sanitary commission

Title: The sanitary commission; Other Title: Sanitary commissioners; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19.5 x 16.5 cm. Summary: Dr. John Sutherland, full-length portrait, sitting on table, facing right, and Robert Rawlinson, full-length portrait sitting on chair, facing left. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9246 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-77794 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

Tartar labourers

Title: Tartar labourers; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 19 x 17 cm. Summary: Group of Tatars at work repairing roadway in Balaklava; wooden hut, “Store 14th Regiment”, in the background. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9238 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-47536 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The tombs of the generals on Cathcart's Hill

Title: The tombs of the generals on Cathcart’s Hill; Creator(s): Fenton, Roger, 1819-1869, photographer; Date Created/Published: [1855]; Medium: 1 photographic print : salted paper ; 24.5 x 34.5 cm. Summary: Cemetery on Cathcart’s Hill showing graves and a man standing at the grave of Brigadier General Thomas Leigh Goldie who was killed in action at the Battle of Inkerman. Reproduction Number: LC-USZC4-9222 (color film copy transparency) LC-USZ62-57972 (b&w film copy neg.); Rights Advisory: No known restrictions on publication.

The End of Roger’s Photographic Journey

Roger gave up photography in 1862 after photographing a final series of remarkable still lives after which he auctioned off all of his photographic equipment and negatives. He also resigned from the Royal Photographic Society and returned to practice law.

After being ill for a short period of time, Roger died in 1869.

Roger’s images stand as an example for attempts made in early history to document war through a medium called photography.

The Library of Congress purchased 263 of Fenton’s salted paper and albumen prints from his grand niece Frances Fenton in 1944. To view Roger’s full collection at the Library of Congress, head over here.

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The post The 1850s: A Visually Stunning Photographic History of the Crimean War appeared first on Light Stalking.

China Hardware Startups: Recalls, Returns and Failures

China manufacturing contractA houghtful and helpful blog post over at the Dragon Innovation Blog, entitled, Recalls, Returns and Failures: Let History Be Your Guide. This post is geared to companies that have their hardware made in China, but its words of wisdom apply to the manufacturing of pretty much any product in China.

The post starts out by emphasizing the need to focus on how your product may not work as promised and how product defects can harm your company, perhaps even bankrupt it:

When it comes to quality planning, hardware startups tend to spend most of their time working on ensuring that a product will work as promised however many teams do not spend significant time addressing the subject of how the product will not work as promised. Returns, return logistics, and possible recalls can be financially devastating especially in the early life of a product. What may appear as a small change in warranty rates can have significant impact on a company’s bottomline and financial viability.  For example, if a company assumes a $250.00 total cost, $50.00 margin and sales of 100,000 units per year, a change from a 5% to a 7.5% warranty rate can decrease profits by 17% and increase working capital by $50,000. A recall or major quality failure can easily bankrupt a company.

It goes on to advise that you figure out the what if scenarios for your product and then include those factors in your design process as early as possible. It then lists out various tools and techniques you can employ to tease out potential product problems. It even lists out the “major root causes” of recalls, including the following:

  • Loosening of joints/connection
  • Small parts or magnets swallowed by children
  • Not following or adhering to federal safety standards.
  • Pinch, cut or severing risks for fingers
  • Breaking/cracking or other failure
  • Overheating
  • Battery failures
  • Excess material or insufficient material
  • Small pieces or magnets falling off
  • Poisoning

If you are looking to have your product(s) made in China, I urge you to read this post. And to further protect against product defects — especially those that are the fault of your Chinese manufacturer — I urge you read the below posts on China manufacturing contracts as well:

 

 

China Hardware Startups: Recalls, Returns and Failures

China manufacturing contractA houghtful and helpful blog post over at the Dragon Innovation Blog, entitled, Recalls, Returns and Failures: Let History Be Your Guide. This post is geared to companies that have their hardware made in China, but its words of wisdom apply to the manufacturing of pretty much any product in China.

The post starts out by emphasizing the need to focus on how your product may not work as promised and how product defects can harm your company, perhaps even bankrupt it:

When it comes to quality planning, hardware startups tend to spend most of their time working on ensuring that a product will work as promised however many teams do not spend significant time addressing the subject of how the product will not work as promised. Returns, return logistics, and possible recalls can be financially devastating especially in the early life of a product. What may appear as a small change in warranty rates can have significant impact on a company’s bottomline and financial viability.  For example, if a company assumes a $250.00 total cost, $50.00 margin and sales of 100,000 units per year, a change from a 5% to a 7.5% warranty rate can decrease profits by 17% and increase working capital by $50,000. A recall or major quality failure can easily bankrupt a company.

It goes on to advise that you figure out the what if scenarios for your product and then include those factors in your design process as early as possible. It then lists out various tools and techniques you can employ to tease out potential product problems. It even lists out the “major root causes” of recalls, including the following:

  • Loosening of joints/connection
  • Small parts or magnets swallowed by children
  • Not following or adhering to federal safety standards.
  • Pinch, cut or severing risks for fingers
  • Breaking/cracking or other failure
  • Overheating
  • Battery failures
  • Excess material or insufficient material
  • Small pieces or magnets falling off
  • Poisoning

If you are looking to have your product(s) made in China, I urge you to read this post. And to further protect against product defects — especially those that are the fault of your Chinese manufacturer — I urge you read the below posts on China manufacturing contracts as well:

 

 

Redux. Blawg Review #318: Fully-Engaged, Participatory, Risk-Taking, Pro-Immersion, Get-Off-Your-Knees, Change-the-World Will Shakespeare-Hunter Thompson Edition.

Cobbe  shakespeare.jpg

HORATIO
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

HAMLET
And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Hamlet, Act 1. Scene V.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

hunter_thompson_motorcycle.jpg

“Maybe there is no Heaven.”
Generation of Swine: Tales of Shame & Degradation in the ’80’s.
Hunter Stockton Thompson (1937-2005)

And Heaven on Earth? That’s up to us, right?

Welcome to Blawg Review No. 318, which follows Texas trial lawyer Mark Bennett’s inspiring No. 317 at the well-regarded Defending People. My name is Dan Hull. I practice law to (1) make money, (2) ensure that every day will be different than the one before, (3) use everything I have practicing law so I can feel alive, (4) serve sophisticated purchasers of legal services who “get it”–corporate clients with in-house counsel normally represented by much larger firms–and put them first, and (5) treat my law practice and firm as both a shop and a laboratory for new ideas.

“Immersion” is what I seek in life and work. So that my life is full, and full of surprise. For me, this is exactly what William Shakespeare (or whoever authored the works bearing his name) and Hunter Thompson had in common. It is the gift, and courage, to get us to fully participate in the story along with its creator. The Singer, if you will, becomes the Song.

April of course is National Poetry Month. Today, April 23, is the day on which William Shakespeare was very likely born and also (strange as it seems) most definitely the day on which he also died. Happy 448th Birthday, Sir–and thank you. In your plays, characters, story and theme strut, bellow, work, play, dart and dive in and out together with all the surprise and verve of real life. As in Thompson’s work generations later, you are always “there”. With us. In fact, the sense of writer participation in the work of both Shakespeare and Thompson shoots through each line. In Thompson’s case–“as your attorney, I advise you to take a hit out of the little brown bottle in my shaving kit”–writer involvement is impossible to ignore as he throws himself into the narrative. The capacity for detachment, while occasionally important and present in the works of both, is just one tool in the arsenal of storytelling. These two authors are fully-engaged. In the story. With us. Now. Immersed.

I want to be that kind of lawyer, too.

Six years ago, in Blawg Review #43, Boston’s Diane Levin gave us a fine Shakespeare edition which celebrates a man whose 38 plays, 154 sonnets and other poems changed the English tongue forever and made it work harder, bend more, stretch mightily and finally give England a language that could keep up with its cascading, unrelenting and wonderfully vibrant and ancient imagination. He used words, made new words and experimented with word-combinations so that both the writing and the author were fully-engaged, participating, immersed in the story, risk-taking. It was not like anything that had gone before it. Read, for example, the entire Hamlet scene above.

Hunter Thompson–I have inadvertently channeled this journalist for nearly three decades since I covered for a college daily an infamous speech he gave–took participatory one step further in his feisty-funny yet oddly clear-eyed new journalism. But, for his time, William Shakespeare’s body of work revolutionized what the English language could do. Changed forever how we saw ourselves. His work demonstrated in and of itself what humans could do to change the world. Simply put, Shakespeare, like Geoffrey Chaucer before him, made English cool. Very cool.

And all of you? I hope all of you will do the same thing with your law practice–and with the entire law profession itself. Please push the envelope a bit for us all.

220px-Chaucer_ellesmere.jpg

But first things first, as they told me when I exited my Final LL.M Program. Shakespeare’s Works? Who wrote them? Francis Bacon or Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, are my two personal favorites for the honor. Perhaps a number of people or a combination wrote them. But not Shakespeare. The chances that the historical person, a well-meaning actor-bumpkin from Stratford named William Shakespeare, wrote all these assorted, richly-layered erudite and intricate gems in a working life in which he retired at 49 is about as likely as learning in a few years that Billy Carter, Jimmy’s brother, invented the Internet, thought up Twitter, and did both theoretical and initial lab work resulting in three Nobel Prizes in Physics over a 20-year period. Or, staying with rogue presidential brothers, that Roger Clinton brokered several Middle Eastern cease fires, engineered Procter & Gamble’s Gillette acquisition, and still had time to join the special forces, get buff and shoot Osama bin Laden.

If he were living today, Will Shakespeare would reside as a community theater local “star” amongst my many cousins in eastern Tennessee in a house with a front porch decorated by all-year-long Christmas tree lights and featuring a really big Coke Machine. My childhood friend Ernie from Glen Burnie, who has an English degree from Yale, and is now a partner and trial lawyer in a well-known DC-based law firm, dismisses the historical Will Shakespeare more comprehensively, if crudely: “Kind of guy who’d try to blow himself with a Dust Buster, if you ask me.” Note: Just heard that Ernie lost his slot again at The University Club.

So Shakespeare couldn’t have written “Shakespeare”. But Someone Cool, Brave and Hard-Working did–and he, she or it changed Everything: character, story, our sense of an inner life, consciousness itself, words–and how they could sing.

So let’s celebrate those who do things, whoever they are, famous or unsung, and especially those who do great things. Which are almost always difficult, frustrating things. A gentleman from South Carolina, trial lawyer Bobby G. Frederick, reminds us at Trial Theory that today is also the 112th anniversary of Teddy Roosevelt’s “Citizenship In A Republic” speech delivered at the Sorbonne, Paris, France, 23 April, 1910. It is an Ode to Quality long-loved by hard-working full-time lawyers worldwide. Excerpt:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

492px-Theodore_Roosevelt_laughing (1).jpg

You get the idea. This Edition of Blawg Review for lawyers who get up and do it every day. Let’s start with three “non-virtual” friends of mine. Patrick Lamb, the Chicago business trial lawyer and law firm innovator who got me interested in blogging back in 2005, is a “trench lawyer” if there ever was one. We share similar career paths and a real drive to build a completely new kind of law firm for higher-end clients. I’ve spent more time personally with Pat than any other lawyer who writes. For several years, and directly due to our connection through blogging, our respective law firms were main drivers together in the same invitation-only international business law consortium based in Austria. We are still members together of a second invitation-only group based in Charleston. We’ve served on each other’s panels on the subjects of higher-end customer service, law practice, and litigation. Pat has great business sense (rare in lawyers) and a fabulous legal mind. See his commentary in “WSJ on ever increasing hourly rate: anyone else get a sense of deja vu?” at his always-provocative In Search of Perfect Client Service. He is one of a handful of people who is changing our profession.

Brit pundit, law professor and velvet-voiced Charon QC, another innovator and doer I met in London in 2007, is one of the funniest and most erudite human beings alive, in or out of the law. If Pat Lamb got me writing again, Charon kept me doing it because he always made blogging, well, great fun. And there were all these great young female “assistants” around him when we met in Mayfair. Anyway, a useful and serious guest post on the UK Facebook litigation by Stephens Scowns Solicitors comes our way in “Careless talk costs jobs“. The UK now has 30 million Facebook users. In Preece v. Wetherspoon, an employment tribunal held that a pub manager was fairly dismissed for gross misconduct after she used Facebook during working time to make comments about two difficult customers. You say you had your privacy settings on? Sorry, Sweetie, not a defense. It’s still public domain.

The ultimate New York City trench lawyer, and non-virtual friend, is criminal defense lawyer Scott Greenfield at Simple Justice. Scott’s made legal blogging–there is no other way to say this–important. Scott, like any number of great lawyers, and great men, is a straight-up pain in the ass. Verbatim quote: “Not trying to be difficult. I just am.” He owes me lunch. He owes me at least $5. But I would, and will, refer any corporate criminal investigation I encounter to any general counsel I know to this man. In serving clients, which is the hardest thing on earth to do well, he gets the importance of: speed, lightning application of law to fact, being right there and being organized. He knows how to talk to the most sophisticated clients in the world when they need a little tough love. Hear him, for example, charm Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Yard and Harvard itself in this one: “Taxing the Frugal Future“. Talk about immersion in the subject matter.

Another Brit doer, David Allen Green, aka Jack of Kent, is a lawyer-blogger with an impressive record of investigative journalism. He asks “should there be a legal blogging prize?, based on his experience last year of reviewing 2000 blogposts for the George Orwell political blogging prize. One of his sources for this thoughtful piece? Our man Charon QC.

Back in the States, well-known Miami trial lawyer Brian Tannebaum writes at “The Practice”, his “combat pay” column at Above the Law, “It’s Not Always About the Clients“, about abusive clients. It’s at once a brave and common sense article that educated me about other practices, especially in the criminal defense area. I did not like the title–I can think of a few others that might fit better here–but I liked what he had to say. He made me think.

Another Alpha Dog, Innovator and Doer: Fellow Midwesterner and Seattle-based Dan Harris writes China Law Blog. Like Greenfield and Tannebaum, he lawyers–and writes–every day. If you work, or want to work, in Greater China, follow Dan. See “The Apple-Proview China Trademark Litigation. It’s Gonna Settle. Bet On It“. Can you ever imagine Dan not telling a client what he really thinks? I can’t.

Super-Athlete and New York PI lawyer Eric Turkewitz covers the Boston Marathon, The Importance of Drinking Water, and my second favorite poet in The Boston Marathon (Highway to Hell)“. This Don Rumsfeld (disclosure: I like and admire the guy) quote and triple-haiku, frankly, has always made sense to me:

There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don’t know we don’t know.

And humorist-lawyer Kevin Underhill of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, a name which is at once lyrical and kind of funny-sounding, but I am not sure why, has written “Plaintiff: This Soap Did Not Attract Women as Promised” at his Lowering the Bar. In my next lawyer life, I would like to do some serious class action work in male pheromone or enhancement products that fail.

Mega-Doers in the Profession:

See the ABA Journal‘s interesting piece, which echos my thoughts on how powerful GCs have become, called The Rise of General Counsel“. “The supply of sophisticated business lawyers has increased beyond demand, increasing the power of a few hundred general counsel who control the budgets,” the article notes. And I think that is a very good thing for the right outside lawyers who can make the transition from specialists to “quarterbacks” and project managers.

At Above The Law, find out what lawyers worldwide are among the most influential people in the world on the Time 100 list.

At Jamison Koehler’s Koehler Law, see a post addressed to the dreaded Slackoisie as infants. It’s entitled “Advice To An Incoming 1L: Humble Yourself Before The Law. Surrender“.

AttorneyatWork has something that I, for one, can use: “Staying Healthy: 10 Tips for Traveling Lawyers“.

The Economist and the Judge on the Bigger Picture, Services, Subsidies: Near and sadly dear to my heart is a must-read by Decline of U.S. Manufacturing by Richard Posner of the enduring Becker-Posner Blog, where Judge Posner hits a few Rust Belt nails on the head. Excerpt:

Becker points to the analogy of agriculture. Employment in agriculture has plummeted, leading to anxieties spurred by agricultural companies about the decline of the “family farm” and the loss of the imagined virtues of the independent farmer, to combat which agriculture continues to be heavily subsidized. The subsidies are widely recognized to be a pure social waste, and the same would be true of subsidizing manufacturing. Like manufacturing, American agriculture is thriving with its historically small labor force.

Finally, here’s a soulful, erudite and off-beat article by Steve McConnell, one of the writers of Dechert LLP’s Drug and Device Law called “The Long Goodbye“.

What About Paris/Clients? is grateful for the opportunity to host Blawg Review a third time. Blawg Review needs to sign up future hosts. It’s always an experience. If you are game, get in touch with Ed, the Editor ‘n’ Chef. The next scheduled Blawg Review will be on May 21 and hosted by Cyberlaw Central, by Kevin Thompson, of Chicago’s Davis McGrath LLC.

Hunter (1).jpg

Original post: April 23, 2012 In memory of John (aka Ed. Post)

Redux. Blawg Review #318: Fully-Engaged, Participatory, Risk-Taking, Pro-Immersion, Get-Off-Your-Knees, Change-the-World Will Shakespeare-Hunter Thompson Edition.

Cobbe  shakespeare.jpg

HORATIO
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

HAMLET
And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Hamlet, Act 1. Scene V.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

hunter_thompson_motorcycle.jpg

“Maybe there is no Heaven.”
Generation of Swine: Tales of Shame & Degradation in the ’80’s.
Hunter Stockton Thompson (1937-2005)

And Heaven on Earth? That’s up to us, right?

Welcome to Blawg Review No. 318, which follows Texas trial lawyer Mark Bennett’s inspiring No. 317 at the well-regarded Defending People. My name is Dan Hull. I practice law to (1) make money, (2) ensure that every day will be different than the one before, (3) use everything I have practicing law so I can feel alive, (4) serve sophisticated purchasers of legal services who “get it”–corporate clients with in-house counsel normally represented by much larger firms–and put them first, and (5) treat my law practice and firm as both a shop and a laboratory for new ideas.

“Immersion” is what I seek in life and work. So that my life is full, and full of surprise. For me, this is exactly what William Shakespeare (or whoever authored the works bearing his name) and Hunter Thompson had in common. It is the gift, and courage, to get us to fully participate in the story along with its creator. The Singer, if you will, becomes the Song.

April of course is National Poetry Month. Today, April 23, is the day on which William Shakespeare was very likely born and also (strange as it seems) most definitely the day on which he also died. Happy 448th Birthday, Sir–and thank you. In your plays, characters, story and theme strut, bellow, work, play, dart and dive in and out together with all the surprise and verve of real life. As in Thompson’s work generations later, you are always “there”. With us. In fact, the sense of writer participation in the work of both Shakespeare and Thompson shoots through each line. In Thompson’s case–“as your attorney, I advise you to take a hit out of the little brown bottle in my shaving kit”–writer involvement is impossible to ignore as he throws himself into the narrative. The capacity for detachment, while occasionally important and present in the works of both, is just one tool in the arsenal of storytelling. These two authors are fully-engaged. In the story. With us. Now. Immersed.

I want to be that kind of lawyer, too.

Six years ago, in Blawg Review #43, Boston’s Diane Levin gave us a fine Shakespeare edition which celebrates a man whose 38 plays, 154 sonnets and other poems changed the English tongue forever and made it work harder, bend more, stretch mightily and finally give England a language that could keep up with its cascading, unrelenting and wonderfully vibrant and ancient imagination. He used words, made new words and experimented with word-combinations so that both the writing and the author were fully-engaged, participating, immersed in the story, risk-taking. It was not like anything that had gone before it. Read, for example, the entire Hamlet scene above.

Hunter Thompson–I have inadvertently channeled this journalist for nearly three decades since I covered for a college daily an infamous speech he gave–took participatory one step further in his feisty-funny yet oddly clear-eyed new journalism. But, for his time, William Shakespeare’s body of work revolutionized what the English language could do. Changed forever how we saw ourselves. His work demonstrated in and of itself what humans could do to change the world. Simply put, Shakespeare, like Geoffrey Chaucer before him, made English cool. Very cool.

And all of you? I hope all of you will do the same thing with your law practice–and with the entire law profession itself. Please push the envelope a bit for us all.

220px-Chaucer_ellesmere.jpg

But first things first, as they told me when I exited my Final LL.M Program. Shakespeare’s Works? Who wrote them? Francis Bacon or Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, are my two personal favorites for the honor. Perhaps a number of people or a combination wrote them. But not Shakespeare. The chances that the historical person, a well-meaning actor-bumpkin from Stratford named William Shakespeare, wrote all these assorted, richly-layered erudite and intricate gems in a working life in which he retired at 49 is about as likely as learning in a few years that Billy Carter, Jimmy’s brother, invented the Internet, thought up Twitter, and did both theoretical and initial lab work resulting in three Nobel Prizes in Physics over a 20-year period. Or, staying with rogue presidential brothers, that Roger Clinton brokered several Middle Eastern cease fires, engineered Procter & Gamble’s Gillette acquisition, and still had time to join the special forces, get buff and shoot Osama bin Laden.

If he were living today, Will Shakespeare would reside as a community theater local “star” amongst my many cousins in eastern Tennessee in a house with a front porch decorated by all-year-long Christmas tree lights and featuring a really big Coke Machine. My childhood friend Ernie from Glen Burnie, who has an English degree from Yale, and is now a partner and trial lawyer in a well-known DC-based law firm, dismisses the historical Will Shakespeare more comprehensively, if crudely: “Kind of guy who’d try to blow himself with a Dust Buster, if you ask me.” Note: Just heard that Ernie lost his slot again at The University Club.

So Shakespeare couldn’t have written “Shakespeare”. But Someone Cool, Brave and Hard-Working did–and he, she or it changed Everything: character, story, our sense of an inner life, consciousness itself, words–and how they could sing.

So let’s celebrate those who do things, whoever they are, famous or unsung, and especially those who do great things. Which are almost always difficult, frustrating things. A gentleman from South Carolina, trial lawyer Bobby G. Frederick, reminds us at Trial Theory that today is also the 112th anniversary of Teddy Roosevelt’s “Citizenship In A Republic” speech delivered at the Sorbonne, Paris, France, 23 April, 1910. It is an Ode to Quality long-loved by hard-working full-time lawyers worldwide. Excerpt:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

492px-Theodore_Roosevelt_laughing (1).jpg

You get the idea. This Edition of Blawg Review for lawyers who get up and do it every day. Let’s start with three “non-virtual” friends of mine. Patrick Lamb, the Chicago business trial lawyer and law firm innovator who got me interested in blogging back in 2005, is a “trench lawyer” if there ever was one. We share similar career paths and a real drive to build a completely new kind of law firm for higher-end clients. I’ve spent more time personally with Pat than any other lawyer who writes. For several years, and directly due to our connection through blogging, our respective law firms were main drivers together in the same invitation-only international business law consortium based in Austria. We are still members together of a second invitation-only group based in Charleston. We’ve served on each other’s panels on the subjects of higher-end customer service, law practice, and litigation. Pat has great business sense (rare in lawyers) and a fabulous legal mind. See his commentary in “WSJ on ever increasing hourly rate: anyone else get a sense of deja vu?” at his always-provocative In Search of Perfect Client Service. He is one of a handful of people who is changing our profession.

Brit pundit, law professor and velvet-voiced Charon QC, another innovator and doer I met in London in 2007, is one of the funniest and most erudite human beings alive, in or out of the law. If Pat Lamb got me writing again, Charon kept me doing it because he always made blogging, well, great fun. And there were all these great young female “assistants” around him when we met in Mayfair. Anyway, a useful and serious guest post on the UK Facebook litigation by Stephens Scowns Solicitors comes our way in “Careless talk costs jobs“. The UK now has 30 million Facebook users. In Preece v. Wetherspoon, an employment tribunal held that a pub manager was fairly dismissed for gross misconduct after she used Facebook during working time to make comments about two difficult customers. You say you had your privacy settings on? Sorry, Sweetie, not a defense. It’s still public domain.

The ultimate New York City trench lawyer, and non-virtual friend, is criminal defense lawyer Scott Greenfield at Simple Justice. Scott’s made legal blogging–there is no other way to say this–important. Scott, like any number of great lawyers, and great men, is a straight-up pain in the ass. Verbatim quote: “Not trying to be difficult. I just am.” He owes me lunch. He owes me at least $5. But I would, and will, refer any corporate criminal investigation I encounter to any general counsel I know to this man. In serving clients, which is the hardest thing on earth to do well, he gets the importance of: speed, lightning application of law to fact, being right there and being organized. He knows how to talk to the most sophisticated clients in the world when they need a little tough love. Hear him, for example, charm Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Yard and Harvard itself in this one: “Taxing the Frugal Future“. Talk about immersion in the subject matter.

Another Brit doer, David Allen Green, aka Jack of Kent, is a lawyer-blogger with an impressive record of investigative journalism. He asks “should there be a legal blogging prize?, based on his experience last year of reviewing 2000 blogposts for the George Orwell political blogging prize. One of his sources for this thoughtful piece? Our man Charon QC.

Back in the States, well-known Miami trial lawyer Brian Tannebaum writes at “The Practice”, his “combat pay” column at Above the Law, “It’s Not Always About the Clients“, about abusive clients. It’s at once a brave and common sense article that educated me about other practices, especially in the criminal defense area. I did not like the title–I can think of a few others that might fit better here–but I liked what he had to say. He made me think.

Another Alpha Dog, Innovator and Doer: Fellow Midwesterner and Seattle-based Dan Harris writes China Law Blog. Like Greenfield and Tannebaum, he lawyers–and writes–every day. If you work, or want to work, in Greater China, follow Dan. See “The Apple-Proview China Trademark Litigation. It’s Gonna Settle. Bet On It“. Can you ever imagine Dan not telling a client what he really thinks? I can’t.

Super-Athlete and New York PI lawyer Eric Turkewitz covers the Boston Marathon, The Importance of Drinking Water, and my second favorite poet in The Boston Marathon (Highway to Hell)“. This Don Rumsfeld (disclosure: I like and admire the guy) quote and triple-haiku, frankly, has always made sense to me:

There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don’t know we don’t know.

And humorist-lawyer Kevin Underhill of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, a name which is at once lyrical and kind of funny-sounding, but I am not sure why, has written “Plaintiff: This Soap Did Not Attract Women as Promised” at his Lowering the Bar. In my next lawyer life, I would like to do some serious class action work in male pheromone or enhancement products that fail.

Mega-Doers in the Profession:

See the ABA Journal‘s interesting piece, which echos my thoughts on how powerful GCs have become, called The Rise of General Counsel“. “The supply of sophisticated business lawyers has increased beyond demand, increasing the power of a few hundred general counsel who control the budgets,” the article notes. And I think that is a very good thing for the right outside lawyers who can make the transition from specialists to “quarterbacks” and project managers.

At Above The Law, find out what lawyers worldwide are among the most influential people in the world on the Time 100 list.

At Jamison Koehler’s Koehler Law, see a post addressed to the dreaded Slackoisie as infants. It’s entitled “Advice To An Incoming 1L: Humble Yourself Before The Law. Surrender“.

AttorneyatWork has something that I, for one, can use: “Staying Healthy: 10 Tips for Traveling Lawyers“.

The Economist and the Judge on the Bigger Picture, Services, Subsidies: Near and sadly dear to my heart is a must-read by Decline of U.S. Manufacturing by Richard Posner of the enduring Becker-Posner Blog, where Judge Posner hits a few Rust Belt nails on the head. Excerpt:

Becker points to the analogy of agriculture. Employment in agriculture has plummeted, leading to anxieties spurred by agricultural companies about the decline of the “family farm” and the loss of the imagined virtues of the independent farmer, to combat which agriculture continues to be heavily subsidized. The subsidies are widely recognized to be a pure social waste, and the same would be true of subsidizing manufacturing. Like manufacturing, American agriculture is thriving with its historically small labor force.

Finally, here’s a soulful, erudite and off-beat article by Steve McConnell, one of the writers of Dechert LLP’s Drug and Device Law called “The Long Goodbye“.

What About Paris/Clients? is grateful for the opportunity to host Blawg Review a third time. Blawg Review needs to sign up future hosts. It’s always an experience. If you are game, get in touch with Ed, the Editor ‘n’ Chef. The next scheduled Blawg Review will be on May 21 and hosted by Cyberlaw Central, by Kevin Thompson, of Chicago’s Davis McGrath LLC.

Hunter (1).jpg

Original post: April 23, 2012 In memory of John (aka Ed. Post)

Redux. Blawg Review #318: Fully-Engaged, Participatory, Risk-Taking, Pro-Immersion, Get-Off-Your-Knees, Change-the-World Will Shakespeare-Hunter Thompson Edition.

Cobbe  shakespeare.jpg

HORATIO
O day and night, but this is wondrous strange!

HAMLET
And therefore as a stranger give it welcome.
There are more things in heaven and earth, Horatio,
Than are dreamt of in your philosophy.

Hamlet, Act 1. Scene V.
William Shakespeare (1564-1616)

hunter_thompson_motorcycle.jpg

“Maybe there is no Heaven.”
Generation of Swine: Tales of Shame & Degradation in the ’80’s.
Hunter Stockton Thompson (1937-2005)

And Heaven on Earth? That’s up to us, right?

Welcome to Blawg Review No. 318, which follows Texas trial lawyer Mark Bennett’s inspiring No. 317 at the well-regarded Defending People. My name is Dan Hull. I practice law to (1) make money, (2) ensure that every day will be different than the one before, (3) use everything I have practicing law so I can feel alive, (4) serve sophisticated purchasers of legal services who “get it”–corporate clients with in-house counsel normally represented by much larger firms–and put them first, and (5) treat my law practice and firm as both a shop and a laboratory for new ideas.

“Immersion” is what I seek in life and work. So that my life is full, and full of surprise. For me, this is exactly what William Shakespeare (or whoever authored the works bearing his name) and Hunter Thompson had in common. It is the gift, and courage, to get us to fully participate in the story along with its creator. The Singer, if you will, becomes the Song.

April of course is National Poetry Month. Today, April 23, is the day on which William Shakespeare was very likely born and also (strange as it seems) most definitely the day on which he also died. Happy 448th Birthday, Sir–and thank you. In your plays, characters, story and theme strut, bellow, work, play, dart and dive in and out together with all the surprise and verve of real life. As in Thompson’s work generations later, you are always “there”. With us. In fact, the sense of writer participation in the work of both Shakespeare and Thompson shoots through each line. In Thompson’s case–“as your attorney, I advise you to take a hit out of the little brown bottle in my shaving kit”–writer involvement is impossible to ignore as he throws himself into the narrative. The capacity for detachment, while occasionally important and present in the works of both, is just one tool in the arsenal of storytelling. These two authors are fully-engaged. In the story. With us. Now. Immersed.

I want to be that kind of lawyer, too.

Six years ago, in Blawg Review #43, Boston’s Diane Levin gave us a fine Shakespeare edition which celebrates a man whose 38 plays, 154 sonnets and other poems changed the English tongue forever and made it work harder, bend more, stretch mightily and finally give England a language that could keep up with its cascading, unrelenting and wonderfully vibrant and ancient imagination. He used words, made new words and experimented with word-combinations so that both the writing and the author were fully-engaged, participating, immersed in the story, risk-taking. It was not like anything that had gone before it. Read, for example, the entire Hamlet scene above.

Hunter Thompson–I have inadvertently channeled this journalist for nearly three decades since I covered for a college daily an infamous speech he gave–took participatory one step further in his feisty-funny yet oddly clear-eyed new journalism. But, for his time, William Shakespeare’s body of work revolutionized what the English language could do. Changed forever how we saw ourselves. His work demonstrated in and of itself what humans could do to change the world. Simply put, Shakespeare, like Geoffrey Chaucer before him, made English cool. Very cool.

And all of you? I hope all of you will do the same thing with your law practice–and with the entire law profession itself. Please push the envelope a bit for us all.

220px-Chaucer_ellesmere.jpg

But first things first, as they told me when I exited my Final LL.M Program. Shakespeare’s Works? Who wrote them? Francis Bacon or Edward de Vere, 17th Earl of Oxford, are my two personal favorites for the honor. Perhaps a number of people or a combination wrote them. But not Shakespeare. The chances that the historical person, a well-meaning actor-bumpkin from Stratford named William Shakespeare, wrote all these assorted, richly-layered erudite and intricate gems in a working life in which he retired at 49 is about as likely as learning in a few years that Billy Carter, Jimmy’s brother, invented the Internet, thought up Twitter, and did both theoretical and initial lab work resulting in three Nobel Prizes in Physics over a 20-year period. Or, staying with rogue presidential brothers, that Roger Clinton brokered several Middle Eastern cease fires, engineered Procter & Gamble’s Gillette acquisition, and still had time to join the special forces, get buff and shoot Osama bin Laden.

If he were living today, Will Shakespeare would reside as a community theater local “star” amongst my many cousins in eastern Tennessee in a house with a front porch decorated by all-year-long Christmas tree lights and featuring a really big Coke Machine. My childhood friend Ernie from Glen Burnie, who has an English degree from Yale, and is now a partner and trial lawyer in a well-known DC-based law firm, dismisses the historical Will Shakespeare more comprehensively, if crudely: “Kind of guy who’d try to blow himself with a Dust Buster, if you ask me.” Note: Just heard that Ernie lost his slot again at The University Club.

So Shakespeare couldn’t have written “Shakespeare”. But Someone Cool, Brave and Hard-Working did–and he, she or it changed Everything: character, story, our sense of an inner life, consciousness itself, words–and how they could sing.

So let’s celebrate those who do things, whoever they are, famous or unsung, and especially those who do great things. Which are almost always difficult, frustrating things. A gentleman from South Carolina, trial lawyer Bobby G. Frederick, reminds us at Trial Theory that today is also the 112th anniversary of Teddy Roosevelt’s “Citizenship In A Republic” speech delivered at the Sorbonne, Paris, France, 23 April, 1910. It is an Ode to Quality long-loved by hard-working full-time lawyers worldwide. Excerpt:

It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat.

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You get the idea. This Edition of Blawg Review for lawyers who get up and do it every day. Let’s start with three “non-virtual” friends of mine. Patrick Lamb, the Chicago business trial lawyer and law firm innovator who got me interested in blogging back in 2005, is a “trench lawyer” if there ever was one. We share similar career paths and a real drive to build a completely new kind of law firm for higher-end clients. I’ve spent more time personally with Pat than any other lawyer who writes. For several years, and directly due to our connection through blogging, our respective law firms were main drivers together in the same invitation-only international business law consortium based in Austria. We are still members together of a second invitation-only group based in Charleston. We’ve served on each other’s panels on the subjects of higher-end customer service, law practice, and litigation. Pat has great business sense (rare in lawyers) and a fabulous legal mind. See his commentary in “WSJ on ever increasing hourly rate: anyone else get a sense of deja vu?” at his always-provocative In Search of Perfect Client Service. He is one of a handful of people who is changing our profession.

Brit pundit, law professor and velvet-voiced Charon QC, another innovator and doer I met in London in 2007, is one of the funniest and most erudite human beings alive, in or out of the law. If Pat Lamb got me writing again, Charon kept me doing it because he always made blogging, well, great fun. And there were all these great young female “assistants” around him when we met in Mayfair. Anyway, a useful and serious guest post on the UK Facebook litigation by Stephens Scowns Solicitors comes our way in “Careless talk costs jobs“. The UK now has 30 million Facebook users. In Preece v. Wetherspoon, an employment tribunal held that a pub manager was fairly dismissed for gross misconduct after she used Facebook during working time to make comments about two difficult customers. You say you had your privacy settings on? Sorry, Sweetie, not a defense. It’s still public domain.

The ultimate New York City trench lawyer, and non-virtual friend, is criminal defense lawyer Scott Greenfield at Simple Justice. Scott’s made legal blogging–there is no other way to say this–important. Scott, like any number of great lawyers, and great men, is a straight-up pain in the ass. Verbatim quote: “Not trying to be difficult. I just am.” He owes me lunch. He owes me at least $5. But I would, and will, refer any corporate criminal investigation I encounter to any general counsel I know to this man. In serving clients, which is the hardest thing on earth to do well, he gets the importance of: speed, lightning application of law to fact, being right there and being organized. He knows how to talk to the most sophisticated clients in the world when they need a little tough love. Hear him, for example, charm Cambridge, Massachusetts, Harvard Yard and Harvard itself in this one: “Taxing the Frugal Future“. Talk about immersion in the subject matter.

Another Brit doer, David Allen Green, aka Jack of Kent, is a lawyer-blogger with an impressive record of investigative journalism. He asks “should there be a legal blogging prize?, based on his experience last year of reviewing 2000 blogposts for the George Orwell political blogging prize. One of his sources for this thoughtful piece? Our man Charon QC.

Back in the States, well-known Miami trial lawyer Brian Tannebaum writes at “The Practice”, his “combat pay” column at Above the Law, “It’s Not Always About the Clients“, about abusive clients. It’s at once a brave and common sense article that educated me about other practices, especially in the criminal defense area. I did not like the title–I can think of a few others that might fit better here–but I liked what he had to say. He made me think.

Another Alpha Dog, Innovator and Doer: Fellow Midwesterner and Seattle-based Dan Harris writes China Law Blog. Like Greenfield and Tannebaum, he lawyers–and writes–every day. If you work, or want to work, in Greater China, follow Dan. See “The Apple-Proview China Trademark Litigation. It’s Gonna Settle. Bet On It“. Can you ever imagine Dan not telling a client what he really thinks? I can’t.

Super-Athlete and New York PI lawyer Eric Turkewitz covers the Boston Marathon, The Importance of Drinking Water, and my second favorite poet in The Boston Marathon (Highway to Hell)“. This Don Rumsfeld (disclosure: I like and admire the guy) quote and triple-haiku, frankly, has always made sense to me:

There are known knowns. These are things we know that we know. There are known unknowns. That is to say, there are things that we know we don’t know. But there are also unknown unknowns. There are things we don’t know we don’t know.

And humorist-lawyer Kevin Underhill of Shook, Hardy & Bacon, a name which is at once lyrical and kind of funny-sounding, but I am not sure why, has written “Plaintiff: This Soap Did Not Attract Women as Promised” at his Lowering the Bar. In my next lawyer life, I would like to do some serious class action work in male pheromone or enhancement products that fail.

Mega-Doers in the Profession:

See the ABA Journal‘s interesting piece, which echos my thoughts on how powerful GCs have become, called The Rise of General Counsel“. “The supply of sophisticated business lawyers has increased beyond demand, increasing the power of a few hundred general counsel who control the budgets,” the article notes. And I think that is a very good thing for the right outside lawyers who can make the transition from specialists to “quarterbacks” and project managers.

At Above The Law, find out what lawyers worldwide are among the most influential people in the world on the Time 100 list.

At Jamison Koehler’s Koehler Law, see a post addressed to the dreaded Slackoisie as infants. It’s entitled “Advice To An Incoming 1L: Humble Yourself Before The Law. Surrender“.

AttorneyatWork has something that I, for one, can use: “Staying Healthy: 10 Tips for Traveling Lawyers“.

The Economist and the Judge on the Bigger Picture, Services, Subsidies: Near and sadly dear to my heart is a must-read by Decline of U.S. Manufacturing by Richard Posner of the enduring Becker-Posner Blog, where Judge Posner hits a few Rust Belt nails on the head. Excerpt:

Becker points to the analogy of agriculture. Employment in agriculture has plummeted, leading to anxieties spurred by agricultural companies about the decline of the “family farm” and the loss of the imagined virtues of the independent farmer, to combat which agriculture continues to be heavily subsidized. The subsidies are widely recognized to be a pure social waste, and the same would be true of subsidizing manufacturing. Like manufacturing, American agriculture is thriving with its historically small labor force.

Finally, here’s a soulful, erudite and off-beat article by Steve McConnell, one of the writers of Dechert LLP’s Drug and Device Law called “The Long Goodbye“.

What About Paris/Clients? is grateful for the opportunity to host Blawg Review a third time. Blawg Review needs to sign up future hosts. It’s always an experience. If you are game, get in touch with Ed, the Editor ‘n’ Chef. The next scheduled Blawg Review will be on May 21 and hosted by Cyberlaw Central, by Kevin Thompson, of Chicago’s Davis McGrath LLC.

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Original post: April 23, 2012 In memory of John (aka Ed. Post)