Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Earth Day 2017: Edition 48.

Today is Earth Day, Edition 48. The first was on April 22, 1970. It was founded by the late U.S. Senator Gaylord Nelson (D-Wis.), and organized and led by Denis Hayes, National Coordinator for the 1970 Earth Day, and since then a mainstay leader, thinker and writer in the environmentalism movement.

Senator Nelson was a lawyer, outdoorsman, true Wisconsin character, ex-governor and hardworking legislator. To get an idea of him, see my 2005 remembrance of “The Earth Day Senator“, which appeared in Environmental Protection Magazine after his death in July of 2005. In Nelson’s very first speech as a senator–in March of 1963–he had argued that reductions in America’s air and water quality to be a pressing national issue.

“We need a comprehensive and nationwide program to save the natural resources of America,” he continued. “Our most priceless natural resources are being destroyed.”

Step right up, folks. This was new and different 1960s-era stuff. Conservation and protection of natural a resources–once the province of civics classes, the scouting movements, and a few scattered organizations like the Sierra Club–was about to become national, emotional and political.

Six years later, Nelson tapped Hayes to launch the first Earth Day. Denis Hayes has been student body president at Stanford University, and an activist against the war in Viet Nam. After Stanford, Hayes was attending Harvard’s Kennedy School of Government when Nelson in 1970 hired him to spearhead the first Earth Day.

Hayes himself became a leader, solar power advocate, author and main driver in the then-new environmental movement. See this past post on his widely-discussed new book (with his wife Gail Boyer Hayes) “Cowed: The Hidden Impact of 93 Million Cows on America’s Health, Economy, Politics, Culture, and Environment.”

sidebar13.jpg
Nelson

hayes-photo.jpg
Hayes

Photo Essay: The Homeless Children on the Streets of Kitale, Kenya

It’s five o’clock in the morning, and a cold mist lies upon the small Kenyan town of Kitale. Only if you walk around the empty town at the break of dawn will you notice the part of life that society is hiding. On cold, concrete floors, all over the city, lie hundreds of children fast asleep.

Their skinny bodies are covered in plastic bags or blankets as they sleep right next to each other to escape the cold and rigid nights. As the first rays of light are sipping through the trees the town is slowly awakening. Some children are running into the damp and misty fog while a young boy brings out an old t-shirt and starts cleaning up the children’s urine and dirt from the concrete floors.

There is a silent agreement with the city dwellers, that the street children are allowed to sleep on the cold floors of the town, as long as every trace of them ever being there is erased in the morning. Nobody wants to know where the homeless children sleep at night.

They are forgotten by people. Ignored in social debates. Through police raids they are forced to their deaths. The homeless children are a common sight in the modern Kenyan society. During the 20 years I have been travelling between Kenya and Finland the number of street children has increased rapidly. Today, I find them in the smallest of cities, including the village I grew up in myself.

My name is Sofia Jern. I am a Finnish photography student at UAS Novia in Finland. In April 2016, I had the honor of accepting a Sony World Photo Award when winning the Student Focus competition with my photo series “Glue Boys”. The past year I have repeatedly returned to Kenya, my second home. I have spent my days and nights documenting the lives of the street children in town of Kitale.

I felt like flipping a coin when deciding to pursue a career in photography. It is safe to say that it was a passion of mine, but that is not why I chose it. Photography is my way to communicate inequalities, or in this case, give the street children of Kitale a voice.

In Kenya, there are 250,000 to 300,000 children living and working on the streets. The use of psychoactive substances, or in this case glue fumes, among street children for survival has been a prevalent problem in most urban centers in Kenya. This is also why they are called the Glue Boys.

Street children is a global phenomenon. In Colombia they are called ‘mariginais’ (criminal), in Rio de Janeiro, ‘polillas’ (moths) in Bolivia, ‘bui doi’ (dust children) in Vietnam, ‘saligoman’ (nasty kids) in Rwanda, ‘moustiques’ (mosquitos) in Cameroon and ‘chokora’ (garbage picker) in Kenya. I know them by the name ‘glue boys’.

Most street children reflect an image of misery, suffering and neglect. They are viewed by society as being dirty, dangerous, unhealthy thieves and so are consequently treated with apathy and disgust. The social stigmatization directed at street children is based on their appearance.

But the children I met go under the name Shidriki, Kevin, Brian and Shadrak, and I can not ask this question enough: who will take care of you?


About the author: Sofia Jern is a photographer based in Finland. Having grown up in Kenya, she became aware and interested from an early age in the issues of social inequality and human rights. You can find more of her work on her website.

We Love Animals Photo Contest Winners

Thank you to all the photographers that shared their best photos showing animals in the We Love Animals Photo Contest with chances to win a Camera Bundle and more!

A special thanks to our friend and professional photographer Elke Vogelsang for her collaboration as a guest judge in this photo contest. Elke Vogelsang is a photographer and author specializing in dog portraiture. She has a passion for creating unique, individual, and expressive pictures that always capture the essence of the moment and her subject. Her images have been featured in publications across the globe. She lives in Germany with her husband and their three dogs.

Congratulations Grand Jury Winner “Fairy Terns and a Fish! ” by LesImgrund

“This picture tells an exciting story in wonderful colours and a pleasing composition. It’s also sharp where it should be (might sound basic, but often enough pictures are rejected as they lack this basic requirement). The light is gorgeous, the exposure spot on, the depth of field beautiful. Congratulations.” – Elke Vogelsang

Congratulations Runner Up “Foraging headless – Lesser flamingo ” by Roy_

“This was an instant favourite of mine. I love the humour. Often enough you’ll find a picture that tells a great story or is funny but lacks the technical qualities. In this case, I think everything works really well. The colours are gorgeous, the composition good, the light is wonderful. Great picture. Congratulations.” – Elke Vogelsang

Congratulations Runner Up “Zander and the Polar Bear ” by stevehikida

“We’ve seen a ton of pictures of polar bears in zoos and some of us might even be slightly tired of them. This picture, though, is very well done. The scene is intriguing, the exposure spot on, the colours are gorgeous and that reflection of the child’s surprised face in the glass adds that little extra storyline. Wonderful picture. congratulations!” – Elke Vogelsang

Congratulations Amateur Winner “Shy Eyes” by christosmit

Congratulations People’s Choice “A portrait of a king ” by nyanamoli

“Red fox family !! ” by philippedebruyne

“Barbary Macaques ” by philipbebbington

“Bullish” by antoniozarli

“Death from Above” by HuyHo

“Peekaboo” by mgtoni

“Tiger ” by duanneanderson

“Red Fox in Puddle” by jessicakirste

“Selfie Master” by meganlorenz

“Chocolate!” by danielventer

“sparrowhawk1” by noelsouthcott

“Elephant in the Dust in Amboseli” by pattebrownell

“concentrate..concentrate…” by JDJohnson

“Great Grey Owl ” by fredlemire

“Sisters” by helgemjs

“Now that you wake me up is better for you to run” by albertoghizzipanizza

“Bear” by robertsijka

“Common Noddy, the angry bird of the Indian Ocean” by StephanieManuel

“A Full House” by terryc

“”Coopers Hawk”” by Iconoscope

“LOOK !” by Dragos_Pop

“We Must Protect” by lenscover

“Open Wide” by garybrennand

“Falcon” by BCF_Photography

“Chameleon” by amina

“Puffin-1” by malcolmlearman

 

“Hey Bulldog” by DaveRogers220380

“_DSC1278” by TheoShilton

“Take Off, Eh…” by DanielParent

“Secrets” by BIGDOGPHOTOG

 

“Daisy ” by JakeOlsonStudios

“Flying in water ” by ErikB

 

“Jag ” by tylerfisher

“The Sign show ” by rodneyervin

“The Love of Gannets ” by NicoFroehberg

“DSC09344bw ” by alef0

“Osprey ” by rjb8267

“Two Little Brothers ” by corradomariani

“summer time vol. 2 ! ” by Marcin_Rutkowski

“Turn that corner ” by marrieladurandegui

“Cock A Doodle Doo ” by KyleBehrend

“Using Paw ” by ClaudioPiccoli

“Free Spirit ” by tonybruguiere

“Peak ” by galinasimphoto

“Posing for the picture ” by gugucuquinha

“B&W Bison 02 – ” by LCdutch

“Yearling Black Bear ” by blurrr001

“Let me see your wings ” by ruthjolly

“Wise One ” by amyholley

“lonely horse ” by BensPhotography

“_Z4T5568-Edit ” by B1RD

“True Grit ” by colinharley

“Rainy day ” by shikhei

“Capra Hispanica ” by GEFAELL

“Elephant-2 ” by PaulPersys

“Cougar Cresting the Ridge ” by anitae403

“Cold ” by hotpixel

“fallow deer ” by marcusfranklin

“By the jetty ” by hamidrad

“9N4A5305 ” by Anneliese-Photography

“Wild horse ” by vedranvidak_1401

“Co-Exist ” by FotoflyStudio

“Somewhere on the river ” by Photomarky

“The End ” by Viesinsh

“A Dazzling Implausibility ” by mpelli

“one eyed king ” by Abulman

“bird of grace ” by premio

“Attention ” by florajakab

“The chase ” by CarolPlummer

“We are one. ” by robertmatakovic

“20150830-Finland 02-2719 ” by milert

“The Stare Down ” by sabatesphoto

“puffin cuddle ” by chrispopsperry

“Asian leopard ” by spicspics

“close up ” by archivlad

“The Cat & The Bunny ” by chertel

“Cheetah and Cub ” by lonniewehunt

“close encounter ” by saboytjie

“Angry Liger Closeup Showing its Teeth ” by macropixel

“Tired Jaguar!! ” by tmc407

“Wildlife ” by volkerhandke

“The Lioness ” by K_Srinivas

“Explorer ” by DanielleLyneePhotography

“The wolf ” by Uni_so

“Curious Neighbour ” by Xsgraphicdesign

“Face off ” by Beyerphoto

“Surprise! (2) ” by lindagagnon

“blues ” by ClaireJean

“Rat ” by Nixx

“Deer ” by Mougaard

“Bonds ” by slowwalking

“moo ” by MariLaegreid

“A Coalition of Cheetahs ” by Mikeirelandphotography

“King Of The Jungle ” by circlepranch

“Fighting Hippos ” by koskarathanasis

“Sad Eyes ” by IanDMcGregor

“Let’s play together!! ” by ceciliazuccherato

“Hello!!!!! ” by charlotterhodes

“catch treat lab ” by thatblacklabby

“Rhodesian Ridgeback Puppies ” by tmh775

“Caterina Ballerina ” by PeterCannon

“Studious Creature ” by jennifersummer

“Who was knocking on my door ? ” by Cezary-Wyszynski

“Watch out !! ” by Bridgena_Barnard

“Light Ray ” by TanyaHouppermans

“Basset Hound pup ” by rpgdepictions

“Bonnet macaque’s hand ” by saravphotography

” ” by sarahking

 

“SNOW MONKEY ” by russellpearson

“”A Low Blow” ” by davidcschultz

“Love in Captivity ” by claudia_lothering_1704

“Rays on Giant ” by bmeiri

“Bob Kat ” by melissa3339

“GREETING ” by joannegraham

“Kitty ” by pattyschmitt

“siberian tiger at the tree ” by icefish

“I am gonna get you! (1) ” by SylwiaUrbaniak

“Turtle Hunt ” by Scubadaddy

“On the Road ” by suellenwinstead

“South Georgia Island ” by Forrest_Brown

“Bundle of Joy! ” by michelewingo

“Baby Blue ” by chrisknight

“Attack ” by thurstonphoto

“Close up of an African wild dog ” by Giulia_avanzi

“IMG_9952 ” by Noizephotoworks

“Devon ” by KarolGams

“_IGP7762bwrino ” by Serina

“All About The Eyes ” by Cobble-Art

“Great white shark ” by davidpstephens

“Cheetah Teeth ” by Mbeiter

“Fox cubs ” by lregoli

“Minor Mynas ” by brendanharvey

“Screech Owl ” by wadeaiken

“Hiding cat ” by Paolo-K5

“Gooood Moooorning Essaouira ” by aminefassi

“En plena puesta ” by jaguarnegro

“Open Wide ” by DanielNorwood

“Purple delight ” by EyeToEyeXperience

“Is this one for sale? ” by ericakinsella

“Blending in… ” by mufasa74

“blizzard ” by DanielCharlesImage

“Panda Bear ” by sandyseyecatcher

“Angus Bull ” by Soers

“Dreaming ” by juliet_lovephoto

“Rum ” by diegoantonelli

“The girl and Elephant ” by kenvinpinardy

“Gentoos in the snow ” by NInature

“Beluga ” by cmatwishynphotodotcom

“I’m a pretty flower ” by ElyseCarpenterPhotography

“_MG_9751 ” by nathanwillsphotography

28+ Totally Awesome Winter In The City Shots

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