Out of the Bush

Upcoming Workshops

Be sure to check out our Workshops page for some goodies coming up! This time we changed the time of year for the New Zealand workshop to mix things up a little bit! 🙂

Daily Photo – Out of the Bush

We stayed and watched these lions for hours on end. They completely ignored us, except for this 1% of the time when I captured this photo. Going back through these photos makes me want to do a serious Africa trip again! I can’t decide if I want to go alone or maybe make a workshop out of it. Maybe I’ll do both, like last time… half the time with the workshop and the other half by myself. It’s a pretty good system, actually, and many of the attendees did the same thing. As long as you’re in Africa, why not spend an extra few days or week there to test out your newfound skills!

Out of the Bush

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2014-10-05 05:03:23
  • CameraILCE-6000
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/100
  • Aperture4
  • ISO800
  • Focal Length200.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

Out of the Bush

Upcoming Workshops

Be sure to check out our Workshops page for some goodies coming up! This time we changed the time of year for the New Zealand workshop to mix things up a little bit! 🙂

Daily Photo – Out of the Bush

We stayed and watched these lions for hours on end. They completely ignored us, except for this 1% of the time when I captured this photo. Going back through these photos makes me want to do a serious Africa trip again! I can’t decide if I want to go alone or maybe make a workshop out of it. Maybe I’ll do both, like last time… half the time with the workshop and the other half by myself. It’s a pretty good system, actually, and many of the attendees did the same thing. As long as you’re in Africa, why not spend an extra few days or week there to test out your newfound skills!

Out of the Bush

Photo Information

  • Date Taken2014-10-05 05:03:23
  • CameraILCE-6000
  • Camera MakeSony
  • Exposure Time1/100
  • Aperture4
  • ISO800
  • Focal Length200.0 mm
  • FlashOff, Did not fire
  • Exposure ProgramAperture-priority AE
  • Exposure Bias

21 Places Every Photographer Should Visit

Every day we are inspired by the beautiful locations shot by the community members. Whether you capture a hidden landscape where nobody goes or capture a location full of people, shoot gorgeous cityscapes and architecture, or just photograph places that look unreal and out of a movie set, we’ve got 21 of the best places to shoot. Take your pick.

The Antarctica by michaelleggero

“Antarctica is Earth’s southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.”

The Falkland Islands by davidianhiggins

“King penguins being ‘directed’ to the sea from the rookery at Volunteer Point on the Falkland Islands.”

Torres De Paine by acseven

“Cuernos del Paine reflection over the glacial waters of lake Nordenskjöld… Or perhaps a vision of Eden’s Gardens?”

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by askd

“Over three days we travelled across the Andean altiplano to cross from Chile into Bolivia. At the end we were greeted with a most spectacular sight – the Salar de Uyuni. At around 3700m elevation, the Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt lake in the world, with amazing pentagonal and hexagonal ridges formed naturally from evaporating water during the wet season.”

The big Island, Hawaii by alainbarbezat

“The big island is the largest island in the United States’ Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest. Within Volcanoes National Park, there are 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa”

Gobi desert, Mongolia by erdenebulganbnbz

“Sunrise in Gobi desert of Mongolia in the Dundgobi province. The Gobi Desert is a vast, arid region in northern China and southern Mongolia. It’s known for its dunes, mountains and rare animals like snow leopards and Bactrian camels.”

Antelope Canyon, Arizona by BensViewfinder

“A shot I took of Upper Antelope Canyon last week while I was in Arizona and Utah photographing. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen and being cramped into this small canyon with so many people was worth the photo ops.”

Cinque terre, Italy by marcodemaio

“Cinque Terre is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline. In each of the 5 towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias”

Havana, Cuba by eladiof

“El Malecon during a stormy evening. Havana, Cuba.”

Central park, New York by jaycohen

“An early morning shoot in Central Park. No people, great leaves.”

Bora Bora, French Polynesia by ryansnodgrass

“We were diving with blacktip reef sharks in Bora Bora on our honeymoon. Was trying out a new housing I had constructed for my Sony SLT A65… I think it works.”

Ban Gioc waterfalls, Vietnam by tongtranson

“This is the most beautiful waterfall in Vietnam. It is located in the border of Vietnam and China. Haft waterfall on the left photo is of Vietnam, the other side is of China.”

Serengeti, Africa by albertoghizzipanizza

“The Serengeti ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located in northern Tanzania and extends to south-western Kenya.”

Machu Picchu, Peru by Laska

“A young llama overlooking the ancient city of Machu Picchu, Peru.”

Vestrahorn, South East Iceland by davenelson

“Situated just outside of the town of Höfn on the south east coast of Iceland, this image captures the natural beauty of the Vestrahorn Mountains across the black ash sand dunes of the Stokksnes peninsula.”

Shibuya, Tokyo by TrashTheLens

“We all need a moment of stillness in the world that hurries around us…”

Varanasi, India by willysanson

“One of the holiest places in all India.. a must see place that will make an impact in your life!”

Hamnøy village, Lofoten Island by hpd-fotografy

“The quaint micro-village of Hamnøy is one of the most picturesque villages on all of the Lofoten. Particularly this view is a Lofoten-classic and has probably been photographed by every photographer ever visiting the islands. I hope I can nonetheless add something new with my attempt..”

The Julian Alps, Slovenia by Robalka

“The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia.”

Yellowstone, USA by MichaelMatti

“Bison in the River in Yellowstone.Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot.”

Prague, Czech Republic by roblfc1892

“Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Early morning on the charles bridge.”

Composing With Textures Photo Contest Winners

View Post

21 Places Every Photographer Should Visit

Every day we are inspired by the beautiful locations shot by the community members. Whether you capture a hidden landscape where nobody goes or capture a location full of people, shoot gorgeous cityscapes and architecture, or just photograph places that look unreal and out of a movie set, we’ve got 21 of the best places to shoot. Take your pick.

The Antarctica by michaelleggero

“Antarctica is Earth’s southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.”

The Falkland Islands by davidianhiggins

“King penguins being ‘directed’ to the sea from the rookery at Volunteer Point on the Falkland Islands.”

Torres De Paine by acseven

“Cuernos del Paine reflection over the glacial waters of lake Nordenskjöld… Or perhaps a vision of Eden’s Gardens?”

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by askd

“Over three days we travelled across the Andean altiplano to cross from Chile into Bolivia. At the end we were greeted with a most spectacular sight – the Salar de Uyuni. At around 3700m elevation, the Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt lake in the world, with amazing pentagonal and hexagonal ridges formed naturally from evaporating water during the wet season.”

The big Island, Hawaii by alainbarbezat

“The big island is the largest island in the United States’ Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest. Within Volcanoes National Park, there are 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa”

Gobi desert, Mongolia by erdenebulganbnbz

“Sunrise in Gobi desert of Mongolia in the Dundgobi province. The Gobi Desert is a vast, arid region in northern China and southern Mongolia. It’s known for its dunes, mountains and rare animals like snow leopards and Bactrian camels.”

Antelope Canyon, Arizona by BensViewfinder

“A shot I took of Upper Antelope Canyon last week while I was in Arizona and Utah photographing. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen and being cramped into this small canyon with so many people was worth the photo ops.”

Cinque terre, Italy by marcodemaio

“Cinque Terre is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline. In each of the 5 towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias”

Havana, Cuba by eladiof

“El Malecon during a stormy evening. Havana, Cuba.”

Central park, New York by jaycohen

“An early morning shoot in Central Park. No people, great leaves.”

Bora Bora, French Polynesia by ryansnodgrass

“We were diving with blacktip reef sharks in Bora Bora on our honeymoon. Was trying out a new housing I had constructed for my Sony SLT A65… I think it works.”

Ban Gioc waterfalls, Vietnam by tongtranson

“This is the most beautiful waterfall in Vietnam. It is located in the border of Vietnam and China. Haft waterfall on the left photo is of Vietnam, the other side is of China.”

Serengeti, Africa by albertoghizzipanizza

“The Serengeti ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located in northern Tanzania and extends to south-western Kenya.”

Machu Picchu, Peru by Laska

“A young llama overlooking the ancient city of Machu Picchu, Peru.”

Vestrahorn, South East Iceland by davenelson

“Situated just outside of the town of Höfn on the south east coast of Iceland, this image captures the natural beauty of the Vestrahorn Mountains across the black ash sand dunes of the Stokksnes peninsula.”

Shibuya, Tokyo by TrashTheLens

“We all need a moment of stillness in the world that hurries around us…”

Varanasi, India by willysanson

“One of the holiest places in all India.. a must see place that will make an impact in your life!”

Hamnøy village, Lofoten Island by hpd-fotografy

“The quaint micro-village of Hamnøy is one of the most picturesque villages on all of the Lofoten. Particularly this view is a Lofoten-classic and has probably been photographed by every photographer ever visiting the islands. I hope I can nonetheless add something new with my attempt..”

The Julian Alps, Slovenia by Robalka

“The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia.”

Yellowstone, USA by MichaelMatti

“Bison in the River in Yellowstone.Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot.”

Prague, Czech Republic by roblfc1892

“Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Early morning on the charles bridge.”

Composing With Textures Photo Contest Winners

View Post

21 Places Every Photographer Should Visit

Every day we are inspired by the beautiful locations shot by the community members. Whether you capture a hidden landscape where nobody goes or capture a location full of people, shoot gorgeous cityscapes and architecture, or just photograph places that look unreal and out of a movie set, we’ve got 21 of the best places to shoot. Take your pick.

The Antarctica by michaelleggero

“Antarctica is Earth’s southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.”

The Falkland Islands by davidianhiggins

“King penguins being ‘directed’ to the sea from the rookery at Volunteer Point on the Falkland Islands.”

Torres De Paine by acseven

“Cuernos del Paine reflection over the glacial waters of lake Nordenskjöld… Or perhaps a vision of Eden’s Gardens?”

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by askd

“Over three days we travelled across the Andean altiplano to cross from Chile into Bolivia. At the end we were greeted with a most spectacular sight – the Salar de Uyuni. At around 3700m elevation, the Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt lake in the world, with amazing pentagonal and hexagonal ridges formed naturally from evaporating water during the wet season.”

The big Island, Hawaii by alainbarbezat

“The big island is the largest island in the United States’ Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest. Within Volcanoes National Park, there are 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa”

Gobi desert, Mongolia by erdenebulganbnbz

“Sunrise in Gobi desert of Mongolia in the Dundgobi province. The Gobi Desert is a vast, arid region in northern China and southern Mongolia. It’s known for its dunes, mountains and rare animals like snow leopards and Bactrian camels.”

Antelope Canyon, Arizona by BensViewfinder

“A shot I took of Upper Antelope Canyon last week while I was in Arizona and Utah photographing. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen and being cramped into this small canyon with so many people was worth the photo ops.”

Cinque terre, Italy by marcodemaio

“Cinque Terre is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline. In each of the 5 towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias”

Havana, Cuba by eladiof

“El Malecon during a stormy evening. Havana, Cuba.”

Central park, New York by jaycohen

“An early morning shoot in Central Park. No people, great leaves.”

Bora Bora, French Polynesia by ryansnodgrass

“We were diving with blacktip reef sharks in Bora Bora on our honeymoon. Was trying out a new housing I had constructed for my Sony SLT A65… I think it works.”

Ban Gioc waterfalls, Vietnam by tongtranson

“This is the most beautiful waterfall in Vietnam. It is located in the border of Vietnam and China. Haft waterfall on the left photo is of Vietnam, the other side is of China.”

Serengeti, Africa by albertoghizzipanizza

“The Serengeti ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located in northern Tanzania and extends to south-western Kenya.”

Machu Picchu, Peru by Laska

“A young llama overlooking the ancient city of Machu Picchu, Peru.”

Vestrahorn, South East Iceland by davenelson

“Situated just outside of the town of Höfn on the south east coast of Iceland, this image captures the natural beauty of the Vestrahorn Mountains across the black ash sand dunes of the Stokksnes peninsula.”

Shibuya, Tokyo by TrashTheLens

“We all need a moment of stillness in the world that hurries around us…”

Varanasi, India by willysanson

“One of the holiest places in all India.. a must see place that will make an impact in your life!”

Hamnøy village, Lofoten Island by hpd-fotografy

“The quaint micro-village of Hamnøy is one of the most picturesque villages on all of the Lofoten. Particularly this view is a Lofoten-classic and has probably been photographed by every photographer ever visiting the islands. I hope I can nonetheless add something new with my attempt..”

The Julian Alps, Slovenia by Robalka

“The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia.”

Yellowstone, USA by MichaelMatti

“Bison in the River in Yellowstone.Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot.”

Prague, Czech Republic by roblfc1892

“Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Early morning on the charles bridge.”

Composing With Textures Photo Contest Winners

View Post

21 Places Every Photographer Should Visit

Every day we are inspired by the beautiful locations shot by the community members. Whether you capture a hidden landscape where nobody goes or capture a location full of people, shoot gorgeous cityscapes and architecture, or just photograph places that look unreal and out of a movie set, we’ve got 21 of the best places to shoot. Take your pick.

The Antarctica by michaelleggero

“Antarctica is Earth’s southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.”

The Falkland Islands by davidianhiggins

“King penguins being ‘directed’ to the sea from the rookery at Volunteer Point on the Falkland Islands.”

Torres De Paine by acseven

“Cuernos del Paine reflection over the glacial waters of lake Nordenskjöld… Or perhaps a vision of Eden’s Gardens?”

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by askd

“Over three days we travelled across the Andean altiplano to cross from Chile into Bolivia. At the end we were greeted with a most spectacular sight – the Salar de Uyuni. At around 3700m elevation, the Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt lake in the world, with amazing pentagonal and hexagonal ridges formed naturally from evaporating water during the wet season.”

The big Island, Hawaii by alainbarbezat

“The big island is the largest island in the United States’ Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest. Within Volcanoes National Park, there are 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa”

Gobi desert, Mongolia by erdenebulganbnbz

“Sunrise in Gobi desert of Mongolia in the Dundgobi province. The Gobi Desert is a vast, arid region in northern China and southern Mongolia. It’s known for its dunes, mountains and rare animals like snow leopards and Bactrian camels.”

Antelope Canyon, Arizona by BensViewfinder

“A shot I took of Upper Antelope Canyon last week while I was in Arizona and Utah photographing. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen and being cramped into this small canyon with so many people was worth the photo ops.”

Cinque terre, Italy by marcodemaio

“Cinque Terre is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline. In each of the 5 towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias”

Havana, Cuba by eladiof

“El Malecon during a stormy evening. Havana, Cuba.”

Central park, New York by jaycohen

“An early morning shoot in Central Park. No people, great leaves.”

Bora Bora, French Polynesia by ryansnodgrass

“We were diving with blacktip reef sharks in Bora Bora on our honeymoon. Was trying out a new housing I had constructed for my Sony SLT A65… I think it works.”

Ban Gioc waterfalls, Vietnam by tongtranson

“This is the most beautiful waterfall in Vietnam. It is located in the border of Vietnam and China. Haft waterfall on the left photo is of Vietnam, the other side is of China.”

Serengeti, Africa by albertoghizzipanizza

“The Serengeti ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located in northern Tanzania and extends to south-western Kenya.”

Machu Picchu, Peru by Laska

“A young llama overlooking the ancient city of Machu Picchu, Peru.”

Vestrahorn, South East Iceland by davenelson

“Situated just outside of the town of Höfn on the south east coast of Iceland, this image captures the natural beauty of the Vestrahorn Mountains across the black ash sand dunes of the Stokksnes peninsula.”

Shibuya, Tokyo by TrashTheLens

“We all need a moment of stillness in the world that hurries around us…”

Varanasi, India by willysanson

“One of the holiest places in all India.. a must see place that will make an impact in your life!”

Hamnøy village, Lofoten Island by hpd-fotografy

“The quaint micro-village of Hamnøy is one of the most picturesque villages on all of the Lofoten. Particularly this view is a Lofoten-classic and has probably been photographed by every photographer ever visiting the islands. I hope I can nonetheless add something new with my attempt..”

The Julian Alps, Slovenia by Robalka

“The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia.”

Yellowstone, USA by MichaelMatti

“Bison in the River in Yellowstone.Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot.”

Prague, Czech Republic by roblfc1892

“Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Early morning on the charles bridge.”

Composing With Textures Photo Contest Winners

View Post

21 Places Every Photographer Should Visit

Every day we are inspired by the beautiful locations shot by the community members. Whether you capture a hidden landscape where nobody goes or capture a location full of people, shoot gorgeous cityscapes and architecture, or just photograph places that look unreal and out of a movie set, we’ve got 21 of the best places to shoot. Take your pick.

The Antarctica by michaelleggero

“Antarctica is Earth’s southernmost continent, containing the geographic South Pole. It is situated in the Antarctic region of the Southern Hemisphere, almost entirely south of the Antarctic Circle, and is surrounded by the Southern Ocean. At 14.0 million km2 (5.4 million sq mi), it is the fifth-largest continent in area after Asia, Africa, North America, and South America. For comparison, Antarctica is nearly twice the size of Australia. About 98% of Antarctica is covered by ice that averages at least 1 mile (1.6 km) in thickness, which extends to all but the northernmost reaches of the Antarctic Peninsula.”

The Falkland Islands by davidianhiggins

“King penguins being ‘directed’ to the sea from the rookery at Volunteer Point on the Falkland Islands.”

Torres De Paine by acseven

“Cuernos del Paine reflection over the glacial waters of lake Nordenskjöld… Or perhaps a vision of Eden’s Gardens?”

Salar de Uyuni, Bolivia by askd

“Over three days we travelled across the Andean altiplano to cross from Chile into Bolivia. At the end we were greeted with a most spectacular sight – the Salar de Uyuni. At around 3700m elevation, the Salar de Uyuni is the largest salt lake in the world, with amazing pentagonal and hexagonal ridges formed naturally from evaporating water during the wet season.”

The big Island, Hawaii by alainbarbezat

“The big island is the largest island in the United States’ Hawaiian archipelago in the Central Pacific. Its diverse terrain spans colored-sand beaches at Papakolea (green) and Punalu’u (black) to lush rainforest. Within Volcanoes National Park, there are 2 active volcanoes, Kilauea and Mauna Loa”

Gobi desert, Mongolia by erdenebulganbnbz

“Sunrise in Gobi desert of Mongolia in the Dundgobi province. The Gobi Desert is a vast, arid region in northern China and southern Mongolia. It’s known for its dunes, mountains and rare animals like snow leopards and Bactrian camels.”

Antelope Canyon, Arizona by BensViewfinder

“A shot I took of Upper Antelope Canyon last week while I was in Arizona and Utah photographing. One of the most amazing things I have ever seen and being cramped into this small canyon with so many people was worth the photo ops.”

Cinque terre, Italy by marcodemaio

“Cinque Terre is a string of centuries-old seaside villages on the rugged Italian Riviera coastline. In each of the 5 towns, colorful houses and vineyards cling to steep terraces, harbors are filled with fishing boats and trattorias”

Havana, Cuba by eladiof

“El Malecon during a stormy evening. Havana, Cuba.”

Central park, New York by jaycohen

“An early morning shoot in Central Park. No people, great leaves.”

Bora Bora, French Polynesia by ryansnodgrass

“We were diving with blacktip reef sharks in Bora Bora on our honeymoon. Was trying out a new housing I had constructed for my Sony SLT A65… I think it works.”

Ban Gioc waterfalls, Vietnam by tongtranson

“This is the most beautiful waterfall in Vietnam. It is located in the border of Vietnam and China. Haft waterfall on the left photo is of Vietnam, the other side is of China.”

Serengeti, Africa by albertoghizzipanizza

“The Serengeti ecosystem is a geographical region in Africa. It is located in northern Tanzania and extends to south-western Kenya.”

Machu Picchu, Peru by Laska

“A young llama overlooking the ancient city of Machu Picchu, Peru.”

Vestrahorn, South East Iceland by davenelson

“Situated just outside of the town of Höfn on the south east coast of Iceland, this image captures the natural beauty of the Vestrahorn Mountains across the black ash sand dunes of the Stokksnes peninsula.”

Shibuya, Tokyo by TrashTheLens

“We all need a moment of stillness in the world that hurries around us…”

Varanasi, India by willysanson

“One of the holiest places in all India.. a must see place that will make an impact in your life!”

Hamnøy village, Lofoten Island by hpd-fotografy

“The quaint micro-village of Hamnøy is one of the most picturesque villages on all of the Lofoten. Particularly this view is a Lofoten-classic and has probably been photographed by every photographer ever visiting the islands. I hope I can nonetheless add something new with my attempt..”

The Julian Alps, Slovenia by Robalka

“The Julian Alps are a mountain range of the Southern Limestone Alps that stretch from northeastern Italy to Slovenia, where they rise to 2,864 m at Mount Triglav, the highest peak in Slovenia.”

Yellowstone, USA by MichaelMatti

“Bison in the River in Yellowstone.Yellowstone National Park is a nearly 3,500-sq.-mile wilderness recreation area atop a volcanic hot spot.”

Prague, Czech Republic by roblfc1892

“Prague, capital city of the Czech Republic, is bisected by the Vltava River. Early morning on the charles bridge.”

Composing With Textures Photo Contest Winners

View Post

South Africa’s Pickled Fish: A Sweet And Sour Easter Treat

Cape Malay cooking teacher Faldela Tocker, with a dish of pickled fish. “Once it’s pickled, it needs to sit for the flavors to develop,” she says. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

In Cape Town, South Africa, Easter is all about chocolate eggs, hot cross buns and pickled fish, a local turmeric-hued, sweet and sour favorite, flavored with spices from the Cape of Good Hope’s Malay culinary heritage.

Although pickled fish is closely associated with Easter, the sweet and sour curried dish has little to do with the Christian holiday. Naturally preserved with vinegar, it’s a make-ahead dish that can span South Africa’s four-day Easter weekend, when no matter what your religion is, socializing and relaxing still reign supreme.

In South Africa, pickled fish is most closely linked with the Cape, where it’s on hand in many households as casual food for drop-in visitors and picnicking. Its spicy roots lie in the Cape’s Muslim population, whose ancestors were brought by the Dutch as slaves from the East Indies: from India, Indonesia and Malaya. As author and Cape Malay caterer Cass Abrahams says: “The slaves knew all about spices; and fish is also a big part of Cape culture.”

An Easter staple

A much-loved national dish that is available even in upmarket supermarkets, pickled fish is generally homemade. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

A much-loved national dish that is available even in upmarket supermarkets, pickled fish is generally homemade. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

In cuisines across the globe, pickling fish was a common and necessary practice before the advent of refrigeration, and each preparation reflected its cuisine’s unique set of ingredients. There are differing opinions about its South African genesis. The earliest written reference that cookbook author Jane-Ann Hobbs has seen comes from Lady Anne Barnard, the Cape’s “First Lady” in the late 1700s, who after visiting a local farm in 1798 wrote that she was served “fish of the nature of cod, pickled with Turmarick.”

While today it’s a much-loved national dish that is available even in upmarket supermarkets, pickled fish is generally homemade and an Easter staple, both for Muslims and Christians. Easter falls at a time of year when fish is both readily available and in great demand, with many Catholics eschewing meat during Lent.

The golden color of curried pickled fish is everywhere at the 150-year-strong Easter weekend gathering at Faure outside the city, where the annual Sheik Yusuf Kramat Festival takes place. Hundreds converge for the long weekend to camp, socialize and visit the shrine to the sheik, credited with establishing Islam in South Africa. While some cooking is done on site, most campers bring covered glass dishes of pickled fish. “We eat it for breakfast, lunch and dinner, with bread thick with butter, rice or rotis,” says Cape Town resident and cook Zainap Masoet, who starts setting up camp at Faure for her extended family five days before the Easter weekend.

One method, many ingredients

A melody of spices, and onions, are used in the spicy preparation. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

A melody of spices, and onions, are used in the spicy preparation. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

As for its preparation, there’s little disagreement about the method, which involves browning fish seasoned with salt and pepper, then cooking onions with spices, before adding vinegar and a little sugar. The mixture is poured over the cooked fish and the dish is refrigerated for two days before eaten. Once pickled, it will last for days outside the refrigerator, say local cooks.

On the other hand, there is definite banter about the ingredients. In her recipe, Abrahams uses snoek, a meaty and somewhat bony local fish, as does Cape Malay cooking teacher Faldela Tocker, whose aunt taught her how to make the dish. “Once it’s pickled, it needs to sit, for the flavors to develop,” she says.

However, Cape Town tour guide Shireen Narkedien, who regularly takes visitors around the Bo-Kaap, the Cape’s historic Malay Quarter, says the traditional fish is yellowtail, which is what most older people still use. Narkedien only uses bay leaf, turmeric and curry powder and says that the onion should be cooked through and “not too oniony,” while Abrahams uses additional spices as well as garlic, and says the onions should still have some crunch.

The appeal of pickled fish lies as much in the generosity of spirit behind preparing a dish for unexpected visitors as much as it does in its sweet and sour spicy taste. “When I was a child, my mother used to always tell me: ‘You cook for the person who is coming,’” said Narkedien, who describes a time when doors were always open. “When I asked her who that was, she’d say, ‘I don’t know, but it will be someone.’”

Pickled Fish

Pickled fish is usually served with buttered bread. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

Pickled fish is usually served with buttered bread. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

Recipe adapted fromCass Abrahams Cooks Cape Malay.” Used with permission of author.

Prep time: 15 minutes

Cooking time: 30 minutes

Total time: 45 minutes

Yield: 6 to 8 servings

Ingredients

2 ¼ pounds snoek, firm-fleshed white fish or mahi mahi, cut into portions

Salt

Vegetable oil

2 large onions, sliced

5 cloves garlic, chopped

1 cup vinegar

½ cup water

2 teaspoons ground coriander

2 teaspoons ground cumin

1 tablespoon masala

1 teaspoon turmeric

2 bay leaves

4 cloves of whole allspice

4 cloves

¼ teaspoon peppercorns

Sugar to taste

Directions

1. Salt fish and fry in vegetable oil until cooked. Remove with a slotted spoon and set aside in a separate bowl; retain oil.

2. Place the rest of the ingredients except sugar in a saucepan and bring to the boil. Turn down heat and simmer until onions are transparent but haven’t lost their crunch.

3. Add sugar to taste and stir to dissolve. Pour warm sauce and oil over fish, making sure that each portion of fish is covered. Allow to cool and refrigerate.

4. Serve with fresh bread and butter.

Main photo: Cape Malay cooking teacher Faldela Tocker, with a dish of pickled fish. “Once it’s pickled, it needs to sit  for the flavors to develop,” she says. Credit: Copyright 2016 Ilana Sharlin Stone

The Reality of Being a Travel Blogger

Enough of the glamor shots, here’s the other side of the story: the reality of being a travel blogger.

For the longest time, I dreamt of traveling the world for a living. Every job I had – whether it was teaching English in Spain, working as an administrator in London or a banker in Singapore – had always been a means to save up for travel.

In 2008, I started this travel blog. It has since brought me around the world – across 115 countries and seven continents – and led to some epic adventures and lifetime experiences. From expedition cruising in Antarctica to overlanding the Silk Road, tracking gorillas in the wild to catching the Northern Lights in Lapland, interviewing locals in reclusive North Korea and camping in the deserts of Iran. It’s the longest — and happiest — I’ve ever been at a job.

I’ve been a full-time, professional travel blogger for almost eight years now. But just like every job, being a travel blogger has its perks and its downsides. I’ve written about how becoming a travel blogger changed my life — now I’d like to share the flip side and show you what my life is really like. Most of you see only the pretty photos and exciting Facebook updates — what you don’t see are the sweat and tears that go behind every story, photo and blog post.

reality of being a travel blogger

It’s not as exciting or glamorous as you imagine.

I get it — you see updates from me in Ethiopia one day and East Timor the next; my social media channels are constantly filled with photos of beaches, mountains or icebergs; and I seem to be going to a different country every month. I know it seems like the dream life and it is — to a certain extent.

The truth is, my life isn’t all sunny beaches, gorgeous hotels, and epic adventures. There are times when I’m absolutely fed up of flying or stressed out from the lack of WiFi connection. It’s one thing to be going on a heli-hike or canyon swing hosted by the tourism board, and another to be sick on the trip or frantically trying to meet a deadline. I know I sound like a spoiled brat here — let me clarify that while I’m extremely grateful to get the chance to go to places like Antarctica and New Zealand on other people’s dime, I just want you to know this life isn’t as perfect as everyone thinks it is.

reality of being a travel blogger

I’m working harder than I ever have in my entire life.

Most people think all I do is travel and write a blog post or two. This can’t be far from reality: I’ve never worked this hard in my life. Travel blogging is an all consuming love affair which requires a lot of hard work and dedication. When I first started blogging full-time, I would spent 12 to 14 hours a day working on my laptop. I completely dedicated all my time and energy into building this website and turning it into a business.

Running a travel blog is so much more than just writing blog posts — the rest of my time is spent responding to hundreds of emails a day, negotiating with potential advertisers and clients, pitching magazines and websites and writing for them, editing photos, creating videos, running my social media channels, and networking with others in the online travel industry.

The thing with being a travel blogger is that the work is never done — there’s always something that I want to get done to bring my business to a higher level. Thankfully, I’ve learned to take things slow, to work smarter and prioritise family life before everything. Since having Kaleya, I’ve cut down my working hours but increased my productivity so I actually get more work done in less time now.

My life completely revolves around my travel blog.

As a travel blogger, I find it extremely hard to separate my life from work. After all, my travel blog is about my life, and I share a lot of my life on the blog. Almost everything I do (at least when I travel), is in the interest of this blog. My husband finds it annoying that I often go out of my way to find unusual places or secret corners just to have an interesting story for the blog.

Sometimes it can be stressful and tiring to be always ‘switched on’ — looking for nice photography angles, searching for interesting stories and brewing new ideas when I’m on the road (and even at home). At times, I’ll be tweeting while out on a wildlife safari, instagramming on a trek, or doing a live video at a festival — and that definitely takes away part of the fun.

I also love traveling to remote and far-flung places where WiFi may not be easy to find, and that can get quite nerve wrecking when I’ve got work to do. It took me years to learn how to strike a balance between my job as a travel blogger and my personal life, but I’m at a better place now for both my physical and mental wellbeing.

I no longer travel the way I used to.

Since I became a full-time travel blogger, my travel style has changed quite a bit (sadly). In order to share interesting stories, I’m always taking photos and videos or asking questions, so much so that I feel like I’m missing out on the full experience at times. Sometimes I really need to remind myself to put my camera down and take in the views or enjoy the experience.

Because of my work as a travel blogger, I travel with a ton of heavy and expensive photography equipment and electronics (laptop, external battery and chargers). That means I carry a 10kg daypack everywhere I go, which can be annoying and exhausting especially when I’m traveling with Kaleya. I also have to be very careful with where I stay and where I leave my daypack to make sure it doesn’t get stolen.

I’ve also become very reliant on the internet and I spend way too much time hooked to my devices.  These days, I make it a point to go on at least a trip or two to places without internet connectivity so I can unplug and fully immerse myself in the experience.

reality of being a travel blogger

My whole life is on the internet.

As I said, I share a lot of my personal life on this blog and my social channels. My whole life is literally on the internet and under public scrutiny. Just google ‘Nellie Huang’ and you’ll learn all about my life, from where I went to school to how I met my husband and even my t-shirt size. It’s pretty scary to think how easy hackers can probably access my security info.

And when so many people know me online, I feel that I have to live up to certain expectations in real life. I’m quite different online and in person, and I always feel stressed when meeting online friends face to face. I’ve also met people who recognised me from my website, and that can be both flattering and disconcerting.

A holiday isn’t a holiday.

Even though I’m always traveling, I’m actually not sitting on the beach and chilling out all day. In fact, I hardly do that these days. As a full-time travel blogger, I don’t get any time off work unless I prepare everything in advance before I leave. That means making a huge effort to clear my emails, meet all my deadlines, schedule my blog posts and social posts in advance and making sure my Virtual Assistant is covering some work for me.

Even then, it’s worth the effort to take a real holiday and leave my laptop behind, rather than just working ALL the time. Now that I have a daughter, I make it a priority to go on a few trips with her and my husband each year, with no laptop and work responsibilities (on our own funds). I’m currently traveling around Southeast Asia for three months with my family, and I limit myself to working just 4 to 6 hours a day. 

reality of being a travel blogger

Press trips may be fun, but they’re not real travel.

I know how lucky I am. I’ve been on press trips to places that I can’t afford to go myself, like Antarctica, Alaska, the Norwegian Arctic, and Bhutan. I’ve had really special, unique experiences arranged by tourism boards and travel brands, that I otherwise would never have on my own, such as heli hiking in New Zealand, meeting the Prime Minister of Palau, cage shark diving in South Africa, meeting primitive tribes in Papua New Guinea, and dining at a Michelin starred restaurant in Spain that was voted #1 in the world.

I’m extremely grateful for all the opportunities I’ve had, and I feel privileged that so many amazing organisations have faith in me and provide me with such incredible experiences. That said, going on press trips aren’t quite the same as traveling on my own. Most of the time, I’m constantly led around by a guide, or I’ll be traveling with a group of bloggers or journalists, being shown places that are targeted to tourists and not necessarily interesting to me. I rather much prefer independent travel, on my own terms, staying and eating at local establishments rather than five-star hotel chains. That’s why I fund my own travels these days so I can travel the way I want to and find the stories I want to tell.

reality of being a travel blogger

It can get lonely working alone.

If you follow me on social media, you would have seen photos of me working on my laptop by the beach, next to a swimming pool, or in a jungle lodge somewhere in the Africa. I have had some cool “offices” in different parts of the world — but in reality, I’m usually working in my backyard or home office in Granada, Spain.

Another thing with working from home is that it can get pretty lonely and suffocating. I used to get depressed after working in my pyjamas all day and not even talking to anyone (except my husband). When my workload got overwhelming, I sometimes wouldn’t even leave the house for a week. Luckily having a baby has changed things — I get out of the house a lot more, and I have less time to work so I’m more productive and I make better use of my working hours.

This is the double-edged sword of self-employment.  It’s liberating to work for myself and not having to report to anyone — but at the same time, it is challenging to stay motivated and cope with the overwhelming workload by myself.

reality of being a travel blogger

I wouldn’t change a thing.

Being a travel blogger doesn’t sound like the dream job anymore, does it? But the fact is, I wouldn’t trade this job for anything in the world. It may not be perfect, but I still love almost every aspect of it. Being able to travel the world for a living has been a dream come true, and while it comes with its flaws, it’s still pretty damn fantastic.

The freedom that comes with being a travel blogger something I value deeply, and the adventure and thrills I experience on the job are what I love most. I’ve lost count of the number of amazing people I’ve met through travel blogging and the incredible friendships we’ve forged. Not everyone has the chance to work in something they’re absolutely passionate about, and I’m thankful for being one of the lucky few.

It’s been eight years since I became a professional travel blogger, and I’m sure there’ll be many more years to come. I hope you’ll join me on this amazing journey!

reality of being a travel blogger


So you want to be a travel blogger too?

By now, you probably get that being a travel blogger isn’t easy. But if you still think it’s what you want in life, then I would suggest taking it serious and doing it right from the start.

For beginners, I suggest reading my complete guide on how to start a travel blog.

For those who want to pursue a career in travel blogging, I recommend becoming a member of Travel Blog Success. This online academy is the best in the industry and it has a number of courses available, ranging from travel writing to affiliate marketing.

Travel Blog Success is currently having a Spring sale from now to Friday march 31, 11.59pm EST. Get 25% off any course, including the Complete Facebook marketing course that I’ve authored.

During the sale, the regular $397 cost of a lifetime TBS membership will be reduced to $297. That’s a saving of $100! 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a commission at NO COST TO YOU. As always, I only recommend products or services I use personally.

The post The Reality of Being a Travel Blogger appeared first on Wild Junket Adventure Travel Blog.

The Reality of Being a Travel Blogger

Enough of the glamor shots, here’s the other side of the story: the reality of being a travel blogger.

For the longest time, I dreamt of traveling the world for a living. Every job I had – whether it was teaching English in Spain, working as an administrator in London or a banker in Singapore – had always been a means to save up for travel.

In 2008, I started this travel blog. It has since brought me around the world – across 115 countries and seven continents – and led to some epic adventures and lifetime experiences. From expedition cruising in Antarctica to overlanding the Silk Road, tracking gorillas in the wild to catching the Northern Lights in Lapland, interviewing locals in reclusive North Korea and camping in the deserts of Iran. It’s the longest — and happiest — I’ve ever been at a job.

I’ve been a full-time, professional travel blogger for almost eight years now. But just like every job, being a travel blogger has its perks and its downsides. I’ve written about how becoming a travel blogger changed my life — now I’d like to share the flip side and show you what my life is really like. Most of you see only the pretty photos and exciting Facebook updates — what you don’t see are the sweat and tears that go behind every story, photo and blog post.

reality of being a travel blogger

It’s not as exciting or glamorous as you imagine.

I get it — you see updates from me in Ethiopia one day and East Timor the next; my social media channels are constantly filled with photos of beaches, mountains or icebergs; and I seem to be going to a different country every month. I know it seems like the dream life and it is — to a certain extent.

The truth is, my life isn’t all sunny beaches, gorgeous hotels, and epic adventures. There are times when I’m absolutely fed up of flying or stressed out from the lack of WiFi connection. It’s one thing to be going on a heli-hike or canyon swing hosted by the tourism board, and another to be sick on the trip or frantically trying to meet a deadline. I know I sound like a spoiled brat here — let me clarify that while I’m extremely grateful to get the chance to go to places like Antarctica and New Zealand on other people’s dime, I just want you to know this life isn’t as perfect as everyone thinks it is.

reality of being a travel blogger

I’m working harder than I ever have in my entire life.

Most people think all I do is travel and write a blog post or two. This can’t be far from reality: I’ve never worked this hard in my life. Travel blogging is an all consuming love affair which requires a lot of hard work and dedication. When I first started blogging full-time, I would spent 12 to 14 hours a day working on my laptop. I completely dedicated all my time and energy into building this website and turning it into a business.

Running a travel blog is so much more than just writing blog posts — the rest of my time is spent responding to hundreds of emails a day, negotiating with potential advertisers and clients, pitching magazines and websites and writing for them, editing photos, creating videos, running my social media channels, and networking with others in the online travel industry.

The thing with being a travel blogger is that the work is never done — there’s always something that I want to get done to bring my business to a higher level. Thankfully, I’ve learned to take things slow, to work smarter and prioritise family life before everything. Since having Kaleya, I’ve cut down my working hours but increased my productivity so I actually get more work done in less time now.

My life completely revolves around my travel blog.

As a travel blogger, I find it extremely hard to separate my life from work. After all, my travel blog is about my life, and I share a lot of my life on the blog. Almost everything I do (at least when I travel), is in the interest of this blog. My husband finds it annoying that I often go out of my way to find unusual places or secret corners just to have an interesting story for the blog.

Sometimes it can be stressful and tiring to be always ‘switched on’ — looking for nice photography angles, searching for interesting stories and brewing new ideas when I’m on the road (and even at home). At times, I’ll be tweeting while out on a wildlife safari, instagramming on a trek, or doing a live video at a festival — and that definitely takes away part of the fun.

I also love traveling to remote and far-flung places where WiFi may not be easy to find, and that can get quite nerve wrecking when I’ve got work to do. It took me years to learn how to strike a balance between my job as a travel blogger and my personal life, but I’m at a better place now for both my physical and mental wellbeing.

I no longer travel the way I used to.

Since I became a full-time travel blogger, my travel style has changed quite a bit (sadly). In order to share interesting stories, I’m always taking photos and videos or asking questions, so much so that I feel like I’m missing out on the full experience at times. Sometimes I really need to remind myself to put my camera down and take in the views or enjoy the experience.

Because of my work as a travel blogger, I travel with a ton of heavy and expensive photography equipment and electronics (laptop, external battery and chargers). That means I carry a 10kg daypack everywhere I go, which can be annoying and exhausting especially when I’m traveling with Kaleya. I also have to be very careful with where I stay and where I leave my daypack to make sure it doesn’t get stolen.

I’ve also become very reliant on the internet and I spend way too much time hooked to my devices.  These days, I make it a point to go on at least a trip or two to places without internet connectivity so I can unplug and fully immerse myself in the experience.

reality of being a travel blogger

My whole life is on the internet.

As I said, I share a lot of my personal life on this blog and my social channels. My whole life is literally on the internet and under public scrutiny. Just google ‘Nellie Huang’ and you’ll learn all about my life, from where I went to school to how I met my husband and even my t-shirt size. It’s pretty scary to think how easy hackers can probably access my security info.

And when so many people know me online, I feel that I have to live up to certain expectations in real life. I’m quite different online and in person, and I always feel stressed when meeting online friends face to face. I’ve also met people who recognised me from my website, and that can be both flattering and disconcerting.

A holiday isn’t a holiday.

Even though I’m always traveling, I’m actually not sitting on the beach and chilling out all day. In fact, I hardly do that these days. As a full-time travel blogger, I don’t get any time off work unless I prepare everything in advance before I leave. That means making a huge effort to clear my emails, meet all my deadlines, schedule my blog posts and social posts in advance and making sure my Virtual Assistant is covering some work for me.

Even then, it’s worth the effort to take a real holiday and leave my laptop behind, rather than just working ALL the time. Now that I have a daughter, I make it a priority to go on a few trips with her and my husband each year, with no laptop and work responsibilities (on our own funds). I’m currently traveling around Southeast Asia for three months with my family, and I limit myself to working just 4 to 6 hours a day. 

reality of being a travel blogger

Press trips may be fun, but they’re not real travel.

I know how lucky I am. I’ve been on press trips to places that I can’t afford to go myself, like Antarctica, Alaska, the Norwegian Arctic, and Bhutan. I’ve had really special, unique experiences arranged by tourism boards and travel brands, that I otherwise would never have on my own, such as heli hiking in New Zealand, meeting the Prime Minister of Palau, cage shark diving in South Africa, meeting primitive tribes in Papua New Guinea, and dining at a Michelin starred restaurant in Spain that was voted #1 in the world.

I’m extremely grateful for all the opportunities I’ve had, and I feel privileged that so many amazing organisations have faith in me and provide me with such incredible experiences. That said, going on press trips aren’t quite the same as traveling on my own. Most of the time, I’m constantly led around by a guide, or I’ll be traveling with a group of bloggers or journalists, being shown places that are targeted to tourists and not necessarily interesting to me. I rather much prefer independent travel, on my own terms, staying and eating at local establishments rather than five-star hotel chains. That’s why I fund my own travels these days so I can travel the way I want to and find the stories I want to tell.

reality of being a travel blogger

It can get lonely working alone.

If you follow me on social media, you would have seen photos of me working on my laptop by the beach, next to a swimming pool, or in a jungle lodge somewhere in the Africa. I have had some cool “offices” in different parts of the world — but in reality, I’m usually working in my backyard or home office in Granada, Spain.

Another thing with working from home is that it can get pretty lonely and suffocating. I used to get depressed after working in my pyjamas all day and not even talking to anyone (except my husband). When my workload got overwhelming, I sometimes wouldn’t even leave the house for a week. Luckily having a baby has changed things — I get out of the house a lot more, and I have less time to work so I’m more productive and I make better use of my working hours.

This is the double-edged sword of self-employment.  It’s liberating to work for myself and not having to report to anyone — but at the same time, it is challenging to stay motivated and cope with the overwhelming workload by myself.

reality of being a travel blogger

I wouldn’t change a thing.

Being a travel blogger doesn’t sound like the dream job anymore, does it? But the fact is, I wouldn’t trade this job for anything in the world. It may not be perfect, but I still love almost every aspect of it. Being able to travel the world for a living has been a dream come true, and while it comes with its flaws, it’s still pretty damn fantastic.

The freedom that comes with being a travel blogger something I value deeply, and the adventure and thrills I experience on the job are what I love most. I’ve lost count of the number of amazing people I’ve met through travel blogging and the incredible friendships we’ve forged. Not everyone has the chance to work in something they’re absolutely passionate about, and I’m thankful for being one of the lucky few.

It’s been eight years since I became a professional travel blogger, and I’m sure there’ll be many more years to come. I hope you’ll join me on this amazing journey!

reality of being a travel blogger


So you want to be a travel blogger too?

By now, you probably get that being a travel blogger isn’t easy. But if you still think it’s what you want in life, then I would suggest taking it serious and doing it right from the start.

For beginners, I suggest reading my complete guide on how to start a travel blog.

For those who want to pursue a career in travel blogging, I recommend becoming a member of Travel Blog Success. This online academy is the best in the industry and it has a number of courses available, ranging from travel writing to affiliate marketing.

Travel Blog Success is currently having a Spring sale from now to Friday march 31, 11.59pm EST. Get 25% off any course, including the Complete Facebook marketing course that I’ve authored.

During the sale, the regular $397 cost of a lifetime TBS membership will be reduced to $297. That’s a saving of $100! 

Disclosure: This post contains affiliate links. This means if you click on the link and purchase the item, I will receive a commission at NO COST TO YOU. As always, I only recommend products or services I use personally.

The post The Reality of Being a Travel Blogger appeared first on Wild Junket Adventure Travel Blog.